Saturday 19 Apr
 
 
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OKG Newsletter


Topic: dvd

The Sweet Life

'Sweet' tastes awful bitter


Comedy

Rod Lott
What's a cult-film company like Synapse doing with a romantic comedy like this? I'm still wondering.
 
Tuesday, July 5, 2011

Tekken

A video game comes to partial life in 'Tekken,' we reckon


Action

Rod Lott
Here's what I knew about the video game "Tekken" before watching the film it now has spawned: "Tekken" is a video game; I think it involves fighting.
 
Tuesday, July 5, 2011

24 Hours to Kill / Assignment to Kill

Spies, lies and ... Mickey Rooney?!?


Thriller

Rod Lott
Why not “Kill” a few hours with a couple of forgotten, mid-’60s spy flicks from Warner Archive?
 
Tuesday, July 5, 2011

Evil Things

What 'Evil' lurks in the heart of man? Roll the tape!


Horror

Rod Lott
Hope you like found-footage movies, because the enormous return on a minuscule budget in the cases of two "Paranormal Activity" entries will guarantee many more. One of the latest, although skipping theaters, is "Evil Things."
 
Tuesday, July 5, 2011

Oblivion

Cowboys and aliens, minus about $97,500,000.


Sci-Fi

Rod Lott
So many reasons exist to see “Oblivion,” a 1994 genre mishmash now seeing a long-overdue release courtesy of Shout! Factory. Here’s why:
 
Thursday, July 7, 2011

Take Me Home Tonight

More than just a great soundtrack.


Comedy

Rod Lott
If your mind reads the title "Take Me Home Tonight" and immediately follows it up with "I don't wanna let you go till you see the light," you're a part of the audience most likely to enjoy this movie.
 
Monday, July 11, 2011

By Crom, it's crazy!

‘Conan’ cartoons coming to DVD

Those of you awaiting the “Conan the Barbarian” 3-D remake hitting theaters on Aug. 19, satisfy your hunger for swords and sorcery until then with Shout! Factory’s DVD release of “Conan the Adventurer: Season One,” streeting July 26.

It’s two discs of the 1982 cartoon series. I wasn’t even aware there was a cartoon series. We’ll have a review soon. In the meantime, feast on these three clips. —Rod Lott






by Rod Lott 07.15.2011 2 years ago
at 10:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
tekken

R&R Q&A with Dwight Little

The 'Tekken' director talks!

Based on the video game franchise, the live-action “Tekken” debuts Tuesday on Blu-ray and DVD. It’s directed by Dwight Little, whose work includes such films as “Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers,” “Marked for Death” with Steven Seagal, “Rapid Fire” with Brandon Lee, “Murder at 1600” with Wesley Snipes and “The Phantom of the Opera” with Robert Englund.

R&R: It’s been a while since you’ve done a feature film. You’ve been working a lot in TV, so why “Tekken”? What brought you back?

Little: It was a chance to re-collaborate with Alan McElroy, the screenwriter, who I did "Halloween 4" and "Rapid Fire" with, and he and I have a great, common creative interest and rapport. I thought the “Tekken” world was a great platform for a martial arts movie. I had some success with "Marked for Death" and "Rapid Fire," and it looked like it was in my area of expertise.

R&R: Were you familiar with the games?

Little: Only in sort of a passing way. I wasn't like a hardcore player, but my two boys are into it, so I get into vicariously. There was a mythology about the family and the Tekken corporation I got inspired by, like you get inspired by a short story or a novel. I also love the ever-changing, interactive fight designs — those were so visually interesting to me. I thought it'd be a way to freshen up the genre of a martial arts action movie.

R&R: Did you approach it any different because it was a video game first?

Little: You look at the existing source material and find the thing that makes you passionate or gets you excited. I made the movie like I would make “Rocky” or “Gladiator” — the goal is to make a good movie, not a good video game. You have to commit to the characters to keep viewers actively committed to the story. Poppy visuals are not going to do it for 100 minutes. Alan and I said, "You know what? Jin and his devil wings, and the boxing kangaroo — let's leave that for a CGI or an anime movie. Let's leave these heavy supernatural items on the table."

R&R: Obviously, you were invested in it, so are you disappointed its theatrical release was so small?

Little: Sure, but that reflects the world we live in. This movie, made 10 years ago, obviously would have been released on 2,000 screens. To market and release a movie now nationally is a $35-to-$40-million commitment in marketing. “Iron Man” and those movies can support that, but there's only seven distributors now, effectively. The way that smaller movies come to the marketplace in an era of a digital world — it's exactly the same as the music business. Our world is changing so fast, but “Tekken” will be platformed on Blu-ray, on Redbox, on iTunes, on VOD and Netflix and pay-per-view, and that's how movies go into the world unless it's Warner Bros. and they have that massive marketing muscle. —Rod Lott

by Rod Lott 07.15.2011 2 years ago
at 10:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Limitless

Bradley Cooper gets smart in an intelligent thriller about intelligence.


Thriller

Rod Lott
Meet Eddie Morra (Bradley Cooper, "The Hangover Part II"), a near-penniless sci-fi novelist with an impending deadline, writer's block and not one word put to digital paper. Then a chance meeting on
 
Monday, July 25, 2011

Stake Land

Bite into this zombie-vampire hybrid.


Horror

Rod Lott
Like the hit "Zombieland" played straight, "Stake Land" follows a grizzled, seen-it-all hunter and his young protégé across a postapocalyptic America riddled with the undead.
 
Monday, July 25, 2011
 
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