Wednesday 16 Apr
 
 
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OKG Newsletter


Topic: eats

American luxury

Packard’s American Kitchen showcases the art of handcrafted fare, from duck mac and cheese to juicy rib-eye hamburgers.


Restaurant Reviews

Greg Elwell
Winners never quit. Even if they start out by losing a bit. Packard’s New American Kitchen, 201 NW 10th St., had to endure an early losing streak. The menu seemed ambitious and different, but like so many restaurants, it took time for the food and the service to meet the high expectations of the customers.
 
Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Greasy spoon greatness

Sometimes a diner is just a diner. A good ol’ hole-in-the-wall can still serve up perfect breakfasts as well as burgers.


Restaurant Reviews

Greg Elwell
We have fooled ourselves, we foodie hipsters. We have bought into this idea that every hole-in-the-wall is a gem merely waiting for us to polish it. And then we can shine it in the eyes of our foodie friends and say, “Oh, you haven’t been there? I’m not surprised.”
 
Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Cheap eats

Where do you eat when your wallet says stop and your belly says go?


Food and Drink Features

Angela Botzer
It’s February, and so far, you’re keeping up with your New Year’s resolutions to save money when dining out. But where can you go for $5 or less? Tax and tip not included, here are twenty gems to check out right now.
 
Wednesday, February 5, 2014

OKG7 Eat: Eastside eats


OKG7 Dining

Louis Fowler

Even though NE 23rd Street is one of the most historical streets in Oklahoma City, many locals tend to forget that it’s also home to some of the most grassroots and homegrown eateries in town, the best having a specific focus on soul food, barbecue and old-fashioned Southern cooking. NE 23rd Street restaurants are OKC’s culinary history all in a few blocks and really should be revered as such.


 
Wednesday, March 5, 2014

OKG 7 eat | Grease? Onions? Yes, please.


Food and Drink Features

Louis Fowler

Legend has it that the first onion burgers were created in El Reno during the Great Depression by enterprising burger-flippers looking for ways to stretch increasingly scarce meat. That costcutting measure still lives and breathes today. While El Reno might be the home of the onion burger, there are plenty other metro eateries that offer the delightful fare.

— by Louis Fowler, photos by Mark Hancock and Shannon Cornman

 
Wednesday, March 19, 2014
 
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