Tuesday 15 Apr
 
 
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OKG Newsletter


Topic: four

Dead alive


Music

Joshua Boydston
What do you get when you put four men from four decades in a folk-rock band? The Dead Armadillos.
 
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Dodging bullets

Released as a prisoner from Libyan forces, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Anthony Shadid says he’s lucky to be alive.


News

Clifton Adcock
In 2002, journalist and Oklahoma native Anthony Shadid lie dying in the West Bank city of Ramallah from a gunshot wound in his shoulder.
 
Wednesday, March 30, 2011

Film it


OKG7 things to do

Gazette staff
Five documentaries across four days examine today’s modern city, showing at Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch. Urbanized, on city design from the director of Helvetica, screens 7 p.m. Thursday and 2 p.m. Sunday, with a panel discussion following the latter. Other films examine the disappearance of darkness, population increase, public housing and eminent domain. Tickets are $5-$8. Call 236-3100 or visit okcmoa.com.

Thursday-Sunday

Hey! Read This:
Urbanized Blu-ray review

 
Wednesday, June 20, 2012

With Great Power ...: The Stan Lee Story

A not-quite-Marvelous look at a pop-culture giant.


Documentary

Rod Lott
There's a great story surrounding Stan Lee and Marvel Comics. I know because a month ago, I read all about it in Sean Howe’s new book about the very topic. As for the documentary With Great Power  ...: The Stan Lee Story, however, it's perfectly fine if the only portrait you care to see is superficial, self-laudatory and largely wart-free.
 
Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Hoop it


OKG7 things to do

Gazette staff
The best in women’s basketball battle it out as the 2013 NCAA Women’s Basketball Regional thunders into Chesapeake Energy Arena, 100 W. Reno. At 3:30 p.m. Sunday and 8 p.m. Tuesday, four teams vie for a spot in the Final Four, to be held in N’awlins. Tickets are $35-$48. Call 800-745-3000 or visit chesapeakearena.com.

Sunday, Tuesday

 
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
jurassicpark3d

Still dino-mite?

For its 20th birthday, ‘Jurassic Park’ gets a 3-D coat.

To celebrate 20 years, Steven Spielberg’s Jurassic Park returns to theaters starting today, this time with a conversion to 3-D.

Does the 3-D add anything? No. Does the movie still work? Yes.

So ubiquitous in our current pop culture is the 1993 blockbuster that there’s no need for me to rehash its plot beyond “man clones dinosaurs.” (For kids, all one has to say is “dinosaurs,” and they’re onboard.) It’s been ages — 19 years, I’m guessing — since I last saw it before this week, and it was a pleasure to revisit its big set pieces, which have stood the test of time.

What hasn’t aged well is the film’s opening — basically, everything before chaos reigns on the theme-park island. It takes too long to get to the goods, and this chunk of time stands as Park’s weakest portion. The 3-D is not only an unnecessary addition, but actually proves problematic by spatially disorienting viewers during scenes of action. Spielberg’s frames wow enough because of how realistic the dinosaurs look (and still do); they’re not in need of the View-Master treatment.

It didn’t bother my 8-year-old, however, and I suspect he’s the real reason Universal Pictures has reopened Jurassic Park’s gates: Now, a whole generation exists that wasn’t around to see the movie when it first broke ground ... or to see 2001’s Jurassic Park III, for that matter. Certainly the studio wishes to prime this batch of youngsters so they’ll be in line for Jurassic Park IV (reportedly with Safety Not Guaranteed director Colin Trevorrow at the helm), and just judging from my son’s case, it’s safe to say they’ve wildly succeeded. —Rod Lott

Hey! Read This:
Safety Not Guaranteed Blu-ray review     



by Rod Lott 04.05.2013 1 year ago
at 12:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

The Four

For martial-arts action, it mostly adds up.


Action

Rod Lott
One easy way to review The Four would be to call it a kung-fu X-Men. Hell, director Gordon Chan (The King of Fighters) already has a pair of sequels planned. The big difference, of course, is that this Chinese/Hong Kong film is a period piece set nearly a thousand years ago. Therefore, it’s not interested in adamantium blades, but counterfeit coins.
 
Thursday, April 11, 2013
 
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