Tuesday 29 Jul
 
 
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OKG Newsletter


Topic: liam

The Expendables 2

Bigger, better, badassier.


Action

Rod Lott
Preceding the start of The Expendables 2 is an ad for its tie-in video game. Why bother playing such a thing when so many sequences of the the movie make you feel like you're doing so already? I mean that as a compliment, because as directed by Simon West (The Mechanic), the sequel’s 15-minute prologue is so unrelenting in nonstop action that it’s likely to turn you giddy.
 
Wednesday, November 14, 2012

The Way, Way Back

Although pleasant, this dramedy works too hard to offer so little.


Drama

Zach Hale
If there’s any type of movie unlikely to offend, it’s usually the coming-of-age story. Films with a relatable central character are more likely to instill a heavy rooting interest in its audience, as we empathize with the protagonist as the story unfolds.
 
Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Darkman

Who is Darkman? It's time you knew.


Action

Rod Lott
Prior to his Spider-Man trilogy, director Sam Raimi cut his superhero-movie teeth on 1990's Darkman, a character of his own creation. Although it's clearly not the most polished of his works, the summer sleeper plays even better as the years tick by. Look no further than Shout! Factory's colorful re-release on Blu-ray. 
 
Tuesday, February 25, 2014

A Million Ways to Die in the West

The new comedy from Seth MacFarlane manages to tire despite exerting minimal effort.


Comedy

Zach Hale
There’s a moment toward the climax of A Million Ways to Die in the West that finds Seth MacFarlane — the film’s director, co-writer and lead actor — hiding among a sea of sheep. As he lays in the dirt, he looks up, and a male member of the herd proceeds to urinate on his face. This particular gag is, for lack of a better phrase, the entire movie in a nutshell.
 
Monday, June 2, 2014

Third Person

A star-studded cast isn't enough to salvage Paul Haggis' heavy-handed drama.


Drama

Phil Bacharach
In 2006, writer-director Paul Haggis surprised and befuddled a lot of Academy Awards prognosticators when he won the Best Picture Oscar for his multistory drama, Crash. He returns to that formula in Third Person, albeit with a pronounced heavy-handedness (and Crash wasn’t exactly subtle) that might leave one pining for something comparatively a bit lighter, such as a colorectal exam.
 
Friday, July 11, 2014
 
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