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OKG Newsletter


Topic: montu

The fifth element

How does Norman-based jamtronica quartet Montu brighten up its already shiny live shows? With lights and lasers. Pew-pew-pew!


Music

Joshua Boydston
It’s all about creating something to remember — in every sense of the word — for the four-piece that started as a modest jam session between Godsy and keyboardist John Barkley on a single amplifier. A drummer in Colby Cowart followed before Russell came aboard, and it’s been a big party ever since.
 
Tuesday, January 18, 2011
mannachineonline2

Mannachine to drop EP, play release show

‘Shiva, the Destroyer’ out Feb. 26

In the mood for a tribal-esque dance party? Mannachine hopes you are.

Oklahoma City’s Jonny Martin, who records ambient/down-tempo electronic music as Mannachine, will release the five-track “Shiva, the Destroyer” EP Feb. 26 and play a release show of the material at Belle Isle Brewery that evening. Norman electronic jam band Montu will support.

Although Mannachine is a solo project, Martin will sport a full, percussion-heavy band for the show. Two songs from the five-track EP are already available online: “Silver Tongues” and a cover of Local Natives’ “Sun Hands.” The art for the free, digital-only release has not been set yet, but will be contributed by local artist Chris Cao.

by Stephen Carradini 02.16.2011 3 years ago
at 09:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Mann up

The tribe has spoken: One former Uglysuit member abandons Western pop for more global influences as ambient act Mannachine.


Music

Stephen Carradini
Mannachine
10 p.m. Saturday
Belle Isle Restaurant & Brewing Company, 50 Penn Place
belleislerestaurant.com, 840-1911
 
Monday, February 21, 2011
RileyJantzen

NMF: Riley Jantzen and the Spirits / John Calvin and the Cavalry / Montu

Train-whistle rock, pop/rock/folk and electronic jam grooves

My second dose of Riley Jantzen came at the Brewhouse, with him fronting his new band, Riley Jantzen and the Spirits. They play what I call train-whistle rock'n'roll: twangless country rock that crunches pretty hard, but not in the modern rock sort of way. Whatever you want to call it, Riley Jantzen and the Spirits are incredibly good at it. I got shivers twice during their set, and it's rare for me to feel goosebumps once during a good show. It helps that Jantzen's voice molds perfectly into whatever genre he wishes, and that his songwriting sensibilities are razor-sharp. His supporting cast is also a critical element; the bassist get props for being especially vital. I can't recommend this band highly enough to you; if you take nothing from NMF but Riley Jantzen, you're gonna be doing alright.

My second go-round with John Calvin came at Michelangelo's, where John Calvin and the Cavalry played their final show as an entity. Members may be leaving him for far-off places, but they didn't show any signs of distraction in their locked-in, 90-minute set of rock, pop, blues and folk.

John Calvin is most fun performer in Oklahoma to photograph, because his guitar faces are just absolutely incredible. He can make guitar faces because about half of the fun of a Cavalry set is listening to Calvin totally wail on his acoustic guitar, which he turns into an electric with a combination of pedals. He let no opportunity go un-soloed in this set, too. Calvin has come a long way since his first shows, and his current versions of his oldest songs show it. "Song to Make the Stars Fall," one of his oldest songs, sounds completely transformed, from a nice pop tune to a tour-de-force. It's a shame that the Cavalry is splitting up, because they certainly know how to turn a tune inside out.

The set felt a couple tunes too long, but when you're headlining a stage at NMF and it's your last show, you pretty much have permission to throw in the kitchen sink. It was a blast, and the band looked like it was having as much fun as the audience.

Montu's electonic jams brought the audience out to Jagermeister stage. I stopped in to check out the sound, and I thoroughly enjoyed the few tunes I caught. They will be headlining Groovefest next weekend, so if you haven't witnessed their clubby, electronic, party grooves, it will be a good opportunity to see them. Melodies and rhythm galore.

by Stephen Carradini 05.05.2011 3 years ago
at 01:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
mustachedevonprohibition

NMF4 life

The pros and cons of Norman Music Festival 4

Norman Music Festival 4 is officially in the books. It came, it saw (metaphorically), it conquered (also metaphorically).

It had a lot of new things: a third day, more stages, new locations for old stages, a weird laser-tag thing, a Friday day stage and more. Many of these changes had pros and cons.

The addition of Thursday to the slate gives the fest the ability to grow into a heavy hitter, but this year, it made things spread a little thin on Friday and Saturday. It felt as if some of the bands were stacked toward Thursday to entice people to go to the new thing: Opolis blew it out with tons of talent on the first night, then had an abbreviated day on Saturday.

Still, despite this enticement, Thursday attendance only hit 3,500 (35,000 people attended Saturday, with 9,000 hitting up Friday). This could have been due to the distance between stages, lack of advertising (several people told me they didn't know it was on Thursday) or the fact that people are busy during the week, but only toward the end of the evening at Opolis did the night really feel festival-esque.

Still, I like the move, and I hope that people get adjusted to a Thursday/Friday/Saturday schedule. I think that as the fest grows in prominence, talent will fill out all three days. The same is true of the new stages; as the festival grows, stages will both be able to fill out their schedules and secure only the best of the best. I sincerely hope that there is at some point a cap to stages, however, lest NMF become like SXSW and get far, far too big to maintain quality.

On that note: Laser tag? What the heck?

The new location for the Main and Jägermeister stages was excellent planning. Main Street was much less crowded, which was necessary. Last year felt like human pinball, and it was quite uncomfortable. The new stage locations make a lot of sense and open the festival up. Super high-five for that.

Speaking of location, putting Dust Bowl Market across from Opolis was a neat move. I liked it there. Whether or not it's been there in the past, I have no idea; I've only recently been getting appreciative of crafts.

The one big complaint I have with the fest is that I still have no idea what it wants to be. There was an upsurge of Austin bands this year (Football, etc.; White Denim; Black Joe Lewis), which could have been due to money constraints or a decision to focus on regional and local talent. The Walkmen are from New York City, which doesn't help either theory. Is NMF a local music festival? Is it going to try to be full of national acts, like Austin City Limits? There has always been a huge amount of local acts, and the presence of Montu so late on the Jägermeister stage provides ammunition for the idea that this will be a continuously local thing.

This confusion is partly due to a lack of clarification in their ad campaigns, and partly because it's still being worked out. And really, I don't care which one it is; I'd love to see an all-local festival, and I'd love to see The Mountain Goats, Sufjan, Radiohead and the Pixies all kicking it in Norman. I doubt the fest will swing to either of those extremes, but it would be nice to know which direction it’s heading. This knowledge would make judging its success and growth easier: I tell a person that the local aspect is the big deal instead of the headliner, there will be less expectation placed on national headliners.

If the headliners are the deal, then NMF should take pains to get bands that would not ordinarily come to Oklahoma. If organizers want it to be a festival about exposing Oklahoma to the outside music world, we need to make a splash every year. This year's headliners weren't a splash: if you search "Norman" at Pitchfork.com, a listing of 2010's headliners comes up, but no 2011 lineup. Seeing as we don't really know if the headliners were intended to be a big deal or not, it's hard to judge the effectiveness of this year's fest.

It was a boatload of fun, however. That can't be knocked. I'm looking forward to NMF5. —Stephen Carradini

by Stephen Carradini 05.09.2011 45 years ago
at | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Still groovin’

No matter its age, Groovefest gets going Sunday, bringing a day's worth of good music and — fingers crossed — good weather to Norman.


Music

Stephen Carradini

Groovefest
Noon-9 p.m. Sunday
Andrews Park, 201 W. Daws, Norman
groovefest.org
Free

 
Wednesday, May 11, 2011

Jam recipe

A spin-off from The String Cheese Incident, electro jammers EOTO combine improvisational chops with dubstep to cross the country, expanding and exploding minds along the way.


Music

Matt Carney
EOTO with Montu
8:30 p.m. Saturday
Kamp’s 1310 Lounge
1310 N.W. 25th
819-6004
$20-$25
 
Wednesday, November 9, 2011

Montu — Bloom


Indie

Joshua Boydston
Being a jamtronica band, Oklahoma City act Montu is at the distinct disadvantage of playing a style of music that simply works better in a live setting than on a recording. Even so, Bloom is a solid effort that never drags — thanks to brilliant pacing any working band should note — and Montu steps over the hump, so to speak, and shows there’s no need to confine its tunes to live consumption only.
 
Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Lotus flowers

Electronic jam band Lotus opens up to focus on composition as well as cutting rugs.


Music

Joshua Boydston
Lotus with Moon Hooch and Montu
6:30 p.m. Thursday
Diamond Ballroom
8001 S. Eastern
diamondballroom.net
677-9169
$15-$19
 
Wednesday, February 13, 2013
 
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