Thursday 24 Jul
 
 
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OKG Newsletter


Topic: pitchfork
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OKS --> SXSW!

It’s time to kick out the jamz

Change the oil, pack the car and cue up the playlist, because it’s time to head down to Austin for Music Christmas South by Southwest. I’ll be down there Tuesday night all the way to the end in the wee hours of Sunday morning. Here’s an audio and video approximation of how excited I am.

You can expect loads of SXSW coverage here at the OKSee blog. I’ll be spending Tuesday, Wednesday and the first half of Thursday covering the Oklahoma Film and Music Office’s The Buffalo Lounge. The fantastic people up at OF&MO have put together a lineup of 28 Oklahoma bands that I’m really excited to see. Expect photos, audio clips (of talking — music clips from my teeny recorder would sound like this), interviews, reviews, news bits, the whole nine yards. It’s gonna be a blast.

I’ll also be tweeting up a storm at twitter.com/okgazette.

From 6 p.m. Thursday onward, I’ll be kicking it all over Austin, trying to catch the best and brightest new music the smorgasbord has to offer. I have several priorities (one of Braids9 shows, Typhoon, Matt and Kim, Rocky Business, Givers), but I’ll be all over the place, reporting it as I hit it. I may even drink coffee to get me through this. My stimulant of choice is Red Bull, but at 10:30 a.m. Friday when I’m trying to get to a Chris Bathgate show at 11, I may have to call in the big guns.

Here’s a whole bunch of SXSW info for those going/lusting:
Official site
Last.FM band aid, which will run your Last.FM account against the listings to tell you who you should see, which will make attendees drool and lusters weep
Guardian complete band listing, with vids, streams, bios and more on each
Bandcamp visualizer – about a fourth of the bands have music downloadable/streaming/available for purchase here
Free iTunes playlist

Thanks to Pitchfork for alerting me to a couple of these links.

photo Braids

by Stephen Carradini 03.11.2011 3 years ago
at 02:40 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
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NMF4 life

The pros and cons of Norman Music Festival 4

Norman Music Festival 4 is officially in the books. It came, it saw (metaphorically), it conquered (also metaphorically).

It had a lot of new things: a third day, more stages, new locations for old stages, a weird laser-tag thing, a Friday day stage and more. Many of these changes had pros and cons.

The addition of Thursday to the slate gives the fest the ability to grow into a heavy hitter, but this year, it made things spread a little thin on Friday and Saturday. It felt as if some of the bands were stacked toward Thursday to entice people to go to the new thing: Opolis blew it out with tons of talent on the first night, then had an abbreviated day on Saturday.

Still, despite this enticement, Thursday attendance only hit 3,500 (35,000 people attended Saturday, with 9,000 hitting up Friday). This could have been due to the distance between stages, lack of advertising (several people told me they didn't know it was on Thursday) or the fact that people are busy during the week, but only toward the end of the evening at Opolis did the night really feel festival-esque.

Still, I like the move, and I hope that people get adjusted to a Thursday/Friday/Saturday schedule. I think that as the fest grows in prominence, talent will fill out all three days. The same is true of the new stages; as the festival grows, stages will both be able to fill out their schedules and secure only the best of the best. I sincerely hope that there is at some point a cap to stages, however, lest NMF become like SXSW and get far, far too big to maintain quality.

On that note: Laser tag? What the heck?

The new location for the Main and Jägermeister stages was excellent planning. Main Street was much less crowded, which was necessary. Last year felt like human pinball, and it was quite uncomfortable. The new stage locations make a lot of sense and open the festival up. Super high-five for that.

Speaking of location, putting Dust Bowl Market across from Opolis was a neat move. I liked it there. Whether or not it's been there in the past, I have no idea; I've only recently been getting appreciative of crafts.

The one big complaint I have with the fest is that I still have no idea what it wants to be. There was an upsurge of Austin bands this year (Football, etc.; White Denim; Black Joe Lewis), which could have been due to money constraints or a decision to focus on regional and local talent. The Walkmen are from New York City, which doesn't help either theory. Is NMF a local music festival? Is it going to try to be full of national acts, like Austin City Limits? There has always been a huge amount of local acts, and the presence of Montu so late on the Jägermeister stage provides ammunition for the idea that this will be a continuously local thing.

This confusion is partly due to a lack of clarification in their ad campaigns, and partly because it's still being worked out. And really, I don't care which one it is; I'd love to see an all-local festival, and I'd love to see The Mountain Goats, Sufjan, Radiohead and the Pixies all kicking it in Norman. I doubt the fest will swing to either of those extremes, but it would be nice to know which direction it’s heading. This knowledge would make judging its success and growth easier: I tell a person that the local aspect is the big deal instead of the headliner, there will be less expectation placed on national headliners.

If the headliners are the deal, then NMF should take pains to get bands that would not ordinarily come to Oklahoma. If organizers want it to be a festival about exposing Oklahoma to the outside music world, we need to make a splash every year. This year's headliners weren't a splash: if you search "Norman" at Pitchfork.com, a listing of 2010's headliners comes up, but no 2011 lineup. Seeing as we don't really know if the headliners were intended to be a big deal or not, it's hard to judge the effectiveness of this year's fest.

It was a boatload of fun, however. That can't be knocked. I'm looking forward to NMF5. —Stephen Carradini

by Stephen Carradini 05.09.2011 45 years ago
at | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Delay Trees — Delay Trees

The best Death Cab album Ben Gibbard didn’t write


Indie

Stephen Carradini
If you’re a longtime fan of Death Cab for Cutie feeling let down by “Codes and Keys,” fear not.
 
Thursday, June 16, 2011

Theophilus London — Timez Are Weird These Days

He’s a long way from the next Kanye.


Hip Hop/Rap

Matt Carney
Judging by the ads Warner Bros. Records is running on Pitchfork, the lack of coverage in more conventional rap and hip-hop media outlets, and hired-gun producer Dan Carey’s résumé (Hot Chip, M.I.A., La Roux), the juggernaut label is marketing Theophilus London’s debut LP, “Timez Are Weird These Days,” toward hipsters instead of a more conventional hip-hop audience.
 
Wednesday, July 27, 2011

VOTD: Stephen's grievin'

Watch Stephen Malkmus and co. rock a dirty, scenic NYC rooftop.

Easily one of my favorite songs from the current Stephen Malkmus album was the youthful, fed-up shouter “Tune Grief,” which gets the Pitchfork TV treatment today. There’s something really perfect about the graffiti-blasted rooftop and sunset, which matches Malkmus’s nonsense-spewing and teenaged attitude.

Also, I really want that super-cool Silver Jews hat that he’s rocking. Don’t forget to scroll through for a couple more tracks from this session, including “Forever 28” and “Senators.”

by Matt Carney 10.05.2011 2 years ago
at 10:10 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

VOTD: Ya wanna buy a van?

Because The Black Keys are selling one.

So Akron, Ohio, neo-blues icons Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney (no relation that I can be certain of) are busy boys these days. News broke a few weeks ago that they’ll soon be releasing a sequel to 2009’s “Blackroc” that’ll include producer Damon Dash and a slew of other rappers — Curren$y, U God, Jay Electronica, Jim Jones and Wiz Khalifa among them. 

You’d think a rock band that’s sold nearly 2 million records and won a Grammy for their last album wouldn’t be too interested in following up on a seemingly one-off passion project, but that’s just the kind of guys Dan and Pat are.

They also can’t stop writing songs or coming up with hilarious ways of promoting them. The video below hit the Internet yesterday, via the newly built website, wannabuyavan.com. It features Bob Odenkirk (of cult-level “Mr. Show” and “Breaking Bad” fame) doing his thing as a frustrated car salesman. While I did love the “Frank the Dinosaur” bit that promoted the last record, and this wonderful, wonderful bit of single promotion Odenkirk’s berating of the idiot driver behind him is hysterical.

If you call the number listed on the site, you hear a recorded message from Pat (who also tweeted the number with the hashtag “elcamino” yesterday) describing an El Camino with “a quarter-million miles on it.” Pitchfork’s reporting that “El Camino” is the title of the album, and it’s due out in December. Pretty excited for this one, guys.



by Matt Carney 10.11.2011 2 years ago
at 08:10 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

VOTD: Ida-who?

Watch meek-voiced Idahoan Trevor Powers (aka Youth Lagoon) give a powerful in-studio performance.

Pitchfork’s often criticized for its enormous sway on consumers, which — from time to time, whether intentionally or without intention — it wields to blow bands up (see: Broken Social Scene) or completely and viciously implode them.

Having nabbed Pitchfork’s “Best New Music” accolade on its recent debut, “The Year of Hibernation,”
barely legal Youth Lagoon most definitely qualifies as the latter, and deservedly so. Watch this beautifully lit video for the song “July,” where Powers draws you in with his airy mumbles and plinky piano playing before ratcheting up the drama into a kick-drum-powered funeral march.

I’ve been listening to this guy’s album for a few weeks now and can verify that several songs on it go from frail to triumphant in mere, wonderful moments. “Posters” and “Afternoon” both get capped by welcome dance beats, the production all fuzzed out and swirling around them. It’s a great record about growing up, and I’m excited to say I’ll be seeing him in Denton, Texas, next week. Watch “July” over at Pitchfork.


by Matt Carney 11.04.2011 2 years ago
at 01:25 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

VOTD: Mountain Man climbs Pitchfork

Not actually mountain men.

Listening to female minimalist vocal trio Mountain Man is more than a little awe-inspiring. Their a cappella harmonizing layers and interweaves upon itself, knitting an old-fashioned sonic patchwork.

Actually watching them perform, however, compares to looking up at a family of well-trained acrobats at the circus, back-flipping off tightropes, tossing and catching each other while the trapeze zooms around the tent.

And they’re kinda cute, sweaty hipster chicks, so that’s nice, too. Here’s “Holy Father,” performed impromptu in a tunnel at this year’s Newport Folk Festival.

by Matt Carney 08.08.2011 3 years ago
at 09:35 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

People are talkin’


CFN

Gazette staff
People of all walks of life are talking a lot about erections at the State Capitol — erections of monuments that is.
 
Wednesday, December 18, 2013
 
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