Wednesday 23 Jul
 
 
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OKG Newsletter


Topic: pixies

Yorn free

It’s been a great 10 years for Pete Yorn. Who else celebrates his first decade as a rock star with two albums?


Music

Joshua Boydston

Pete Yorn with Ben Kweller and The Wellspring
7 p.m. Sunday
Diamond Ballroom, 8001 S. Eastern
DiamondBallroom.net, 677-9169
$22 advance, $24 door

 
Wednesday, April 13, 2011

Imperial unit

The friends that play together, stay together — and vice versa, according to the close-knit members of Norman’s Crown Imperial.


Music

Joshua Boydston

Crown Imperial with Locust Avenue
9 p.m. Friday
Opolis, 113 N. Crawford, Norman
opolis.org 820-0951
$5

 
Wednesday, April 13, 2011
mustachedevonprohibition

NMF4 life

The pros and cons of Norman Music Festival 4

Norman Music Festival 4 is officially in the books. It came, it saw (metaphorically), it conquered (also metaphorically).

It had a lot of new things: a third day, more stages, new locations for old stages, a weird laser-tag thing, a Friday day stage and more. Many of these changes had pros and cons.

The addition of Thursday to the slate gives the fest the ability to grow into a heavy hitter, but this year, it made things spread a little thin on Friday and Saturday. It felt as if some of the bands were stacked toward Thursday to entice people to go to the new thing: Opolis blew it out with tons of talent on the first night, then had an abbreviated day on Saturday.

Still, despite this enticement, Thursday attendance only hit 3,500 (35,000 people attended Saturday, with 9,000 hitting up Friday). This could have been due to the distance between stages, lack of advertising (several people told me they didn't know it was on Thursday) or the fact that people are busy during the week, but only toward the end of the evening at Opolis did the night really feel festival-esque.

Still, I like the move, and I hope that people get adjusted to a Thursday/Friday/Saturday schedule. I think that as the fest grows in prominence, talent will fill out all three days. The same is true of the new stages; as the festival grows, stages will both be able to fill out their schedules and secure only the best of the best. I sincerely hope that there is at some point a cap to stages, however, lest NMF become like SXSW and get far, far too big to maintain quality.

On that note: Laser tag? What the heck?

The new location for the Main and Jägermeister stages was excellent planning. Main Street was much less crowded, which was necessary. Last year felt like human pinball, and it was quite uncomfortable. The new stage locations make a lot of sense and open the festival up. Super high-five for that.

Speaking of location, putting Dust Bowl Market across from Opolis was a neat move. I liked it there. Whether or not it's been there in the past, I have no idea; I've only recently been getting appreciative of crafts.

The one big complaint I have with the fest is that I still have no idea what it wants to be. There was an upsurge of Austin bands this year (Football, etc.; White Denim; Black Joe Lewis), which could have been due to money constraints or a decision to focus on regional and local talent. The Walkmen are from New York City, which doesn't help either theory. Is NMF a local music festival? Is it going to try to be full of national acts, like Austin City Limits? There has always been a huge amount of local acts, and the presence of Montu so late on the Jägermeister stage provides ammunition for the idea that this will be a continuously local thing.

This confusion is partly due to a lack of clarification in their ad campaigns, and partly because it's still being worked out. And really, I don't care which one it is; I'd love to see an all-local festival, and I'd love to see The Mountain Goats, Sufjan, Radiohead and the Pixies all kicking it in Norman. I doubt the fest will swing to either of those extremes, but it would be nice to know which direction it’s heading. This knowledge would make judging its success and growth easier: I tell a person that the local aspect is the big deal instead of the headliner, there will be less expectation placed on national headliners.

If the headliners are the deal, then NMF should take pains to get bands that would not ordinarily come to Oklahoma. If organizers want it to be a festival about exposing Oklahoma to the outside music world, we need to make a splash every year. This year's headliners weren't a splash: if you search "Norman" at Pitchfork.com, a listing of 2010's headliners comes up, but no 2011 lineup. Seeing as we don't really know if the headliners were intended to be a big deal or not, it's hard to judge the effectiveness of this year's fest.

It was a boatload of fun, however. That can't be knocked. I'm looking forward to NMF5. —Stephen Carradini

by Stephen Carradini 05.09.2011 45 years ago
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Pixies stick

For a band that hasn’t released an album in two decades, the Pixies are mighty busy.


Music

Phil Bacharach
Pixies with Imaginary Cities
7 p.m. Tuesday
Coca-Cola Bricktown Events Center
425 E. California
ticketstorm.com
866-966-1777
$42.50
 
Wednesday, November 9, 2011
pixiesthumb

Pixies do ‘Doolittle’

Gouge away at pics from the Pixies’ visit to Bricktown.

I was born less than a year prior to “Doolittle”’s April 1989 release, so I imagine if I’d have heard it then, it would’ve likely damaged my little ears much worse than when I walked past the stage-level speakers in the photo pit last night.

Absolutely inhuman sounds blasted from them, a mix of Frank Black’s snarling caterwaul and Joey Santiago’s damaged guitar playing. If you like your noise just as much as you like your pop hooks, then Bricktown was the place to be last night. Check out my photos:

by Matt Carney 11.16.2011 2 years ago
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Dead alive

Despite personal setbacks, the leader of Tulsa-based Dead Sea Choir sees waves of optimism in the band’s near future.


Music

Joshua Boydston
Dead Sea Choir with Brother Bear
9 p.m. Saturday
Opolis
113 N. Crawford, Norman
opolis.org
820-0951
$7
 
Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Fablecar — Fablecar


Rock

Joshua Boydston
Yukon’s Fablecar seems to have emerged from whatever year the Pixies and U2 would have crossed paths with David Bowie. It’s a big, ambitious, self-titled debut, one that stands tall more often than falling flat. Even the missteps are forgivable, as it’s refreshing to hear a young band take a swing at something wholly original.
 
Wednesday, August 22, 2012
soundcity

Grohl on

Former Nirvana drummer Dave Grohl makes a music documentary, ‘Sound City.’

Dave Grohl’s not just a Foo Fighter. Now he’s a film director.

Sound City, his documentary on the historic L.A. recording studio of the same name, is set to screen locally once and once only: at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at Harkins Bricktown Cinemas 16, 150 E. Reno. It’s scheduled for nowhere else in the state.

Fresh from its Jan. 18 premiere at the Sundance Film Festival, the film includes such music heavyweights as Nirvana’s Krist Novoselic, Tom Petty, Fleetwood Mac’s Stevie Nicks, Rick Springfield, Nine Inch Nails’ Trent Reznor, Barry Manilow, Pixies’ Frank Black, producer Rick Rubin, Weezer’s Rivers Cuomo, John Fogerty, Metallica’s Lars Ulrich and many, many more.

For tickets, visit harkinstheatres.com. —Rod Lott

Hey! Read This:
5 WTF Facts About Rick Springfield     
Barry Manilow interview   
Pixies interview    



by Rod Lott 01.30.2013 1 year ago
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Bread + butter

Local music video directors LAMAR+NIK are making serious waves in a quietly thriving art form.


Music

Zach Hale

If you think the music video is a dying art form, you haven’t being paying attention. Sure, it has probably been a good decade or so since MTV has shown one, and if a Top 40 track does get the video treatment, it’s usually not the most artistic visual representation.

 
Wednesday, October 16, 2013
 
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