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OKG Newsletter


Topic: post-rock

Collections of Colonies of Bees — GIVING

Wisconsin instrumental post-rockers return to old form after their Volcano Choir collaboration with Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon.


Indie

Matt Carney
Clocking in at just under half an hour, Milwaukee-based Collections of Colonies of Bees recorded a lyric-less gem in their latest offering, “Giving,” strong enough an effort to challenge the current incumbents Explosions in the Sky as our best post-rock build-up instrumental band.
 
Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Tympanic TNT

Boom go the dynamite sounds of Explosions in the Sky, the beloved band instrumental to keeping the world interested in moving music without lyrics.


Music

Joshua Boydston

Explosions In The Sky with Wye Oak
7 p.m. Thursday
Diamond Ballroom
8001 S. Eastern
diamondballroom.net
677-9169
$19 advance, $24 door

 
Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Musical entity

As their band name suggests, Norman post-rockers Gentle Ghost play aggressive music that’s unsettling, yet far from menacing.


Music

Matt Carney
Gentle Ghost with Chris Bathgate and Riley Jantzen & The Spirits
Saturday
The Deli
309 White, Norman
thedeli.us
321-7048
 
Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Current event

It’s not enough for Norman’s scariest psychedelic/Goth shoegazers, Depth & Current, to just sound like your nightmares. They want to cause them, too.


Music

Matt Carney
Depth & Current with Lizard Police and Paint Scratcher
9 p.m. Thursday
Opolis
113 N. Crawford, Norman
opolis.org
820-0951
$8
advance, $10 door
 
Wednesday, December 7, 2011

OKS Chatter: Depth & Current

Norman’s scariest shoegazers talk sound textures, using recordings of alien conspiracy theorists, and their awesome debut album.

Don’t be fooled by the phrase “debut full-length.” Norman Goth/shoegaze rockers Depth & Current are veterans of the local music scene.

Front man and principal member Chris Harris runs a recording studio (Hook Echo Sound) and a small record label (Nice People Records), which have put him in touch with bands both near and far. Guitarist Derek Lemke plays in Shitty/Awesome, and I swear I see him every time I go to Opolis. Drummer Scott Twitchell said he’s played in bands since his first teenage punk band as a kid, and judging by the way he talks about songwriting, it’s probably one of the things he thinks about most.

I got to sit and chat with the band after a recent rehearsal at Hook Echo in advance of their upcoming CD release show at Opolis, mostly about the album itself. As you’ll soon find out, they’re very excited to unveil these new songs in public.  

OKS: This, your debut record, is a lot more sonically sophisticated than most locally produced stuff. Is there apprehension about recreating it live?


Harris: No.

Twitchell: No.

Lemke: No.

OKS: Not at all?

Twitchell: The live stuff usually just happens. Last week was the first time we’d played a couple of the songs live together. It’s always going to be a little different, but they’re the same songs. It’s interesting how it takes everything on the record — the sounds and the textures are still there — but it takes it all and makes it a little more raw, I guess. It’s a lot more fun that way.

Harris: There being only three of us, we’re using sequence for our live shows so everything’s all timed to the music. We’re able to fly in bits and pieces of sounds from what you’ve heard on the album or maybe even an alternate take of something, and recreate the same kind of soundscape ... to me, it’s the same kind of soundscape, but it’s more intense live.


OKS: Louder, usually?

Harris: Yeah.

OKS: So the spoken word stuff’ll be there, too?

Harris: Yeah, you’ll hear that live.

OKS: That’s awesome. One of the things I talked about recently with Brady Smith of Gentle Ghost, they had the spoken-word samples playing too.

Harris: Yeah, they had them going between every song. It was awesome. I think they had them going through a little tiny guitar amplifier on stage. It sounded really cool.

Lemke: They used one of those Boss loop pedals. Just loaded some stuff on there and [makes flipping sound].

Twitchell: That’s a really good, easy way to do it.

OKS: Yeah, Brady said Ryan Lindsey had gotten him and Seth McCarroll listening to these paranormal-investigation podcasts.

Harris: You know what it sounded like? It sounded like these weird, small-town AM radio stations where they go crazy with, like, over-the-top conspiracy stuff. I used to be able to listen to that from my apartment because I had an old PA — it’s actually the PA we use for practice now — and we would record through it. We were getting the levels all wrong, and it started picking up weird radio frequencies and different CVs and stuff, and I would hear some outrageous alien-conspiracy stuff. I probably still have bags and bags of that stuff recorded on it.

OKS: No way.

Harris: It was freaky.

OKS: There’s gotta be a project in there.

Harris: I’ve mined that stuff and used a lot of it. There’s stuff where I’d hit different distortion pedals and make it louder and sound different in some way. I did a lot of that stuff. It first started happening when I lived off of Highway 9, over at Post Oak Apartments. I would hear a lot of CV radio. Then when I moved out to Amber [Okla.] and lived out in the country, I would hit these distortion pedals and hear these crazy preachers and alien-conspiracy theorists and government-conspiracy theorists. It was pretty insane.

OKS: There’s the spoken-word piece that opens the album. Is that mined from one of those old recordings?

Harris: No, that’s an interview that we found that was pretty strange and deranged. We chopped it up, and rearranged some of the words so it would tell a different story from what it was actually telling. And then we decided — instead of using the voice we found in the interview — that we’d take all that chopped-up and rearranged stuff and make a computer say it. It would take some ridiculous reverse-engineering to figure out where it all comes from, but it basically is a story that we heard that we thought sounded cool if you changed the sequence of events.

OKS: That bit primed me — when I listened to the album, I interpreted it this way — for the notion that the narrator of the songs wasn’t necessarily evil or crazy or whatever. It sounds more like it’s society around him.

Harris: Yeah. That’s at the heart of a lot of the themes on the record.

OKS: Talk a little about My Bloody Valentine’s influence on this record. When I listened to “Chkill” and the second song, it was the first band that came to mind.



Harris: It’s a huge influence on us for sure.

Lemke: Pretty much my favorite band.

Harris: Even the other songs that aren’t so blatantly and obviously stealing from that vibe, there’s atmospheric things going on that might be operating in a different context from what My Bloody Valentine would’ve done. It’s where a lot of the textural stuff comes from.

It would be so crazy for people to be able to hear the record where they could turn Derek all the way down, and hear what it sounds like. And then Derek all the way up and hear the textures and soundscapes. It’s like, when you’re listening to the song, they’re not right there on the front of the song. They’re atmospheric. But if you hit “mute,” you would notice it was gone immediately, and it would sound worse. And then as soon as it comes back, it’s like “Oh, yeah, that’s the sound.” A lot of that comes from My Bloody Valentine and their textural pop music.

Twitchell: Derek’s kind of a guitar wizard.

Lemke: I’m a noise wizard.

Twitchell: Yeah, there you go.

Harris: Yeah, he can do that shit with any instrument.

Lemke: I’ll make anything noisy.

OKS: That brings up a point worth discussing. You guys clearly like noise, but you don’t speed up super-fast, which I thought was interesting because a lot of bands attracted to noise are also attracted to speed.

Twitchell: We don’t have any recordings of a whole lot of fast stuff, besides “Calm to the Sea,” but live, we’ve played several different versions of songs twice as fast. The slowest song on our first EP, we’ve played that several times live and it’s--

Harris: Three times as fast.

Twitchell: Yeah, it’s been a complete punk-rock overhaul on the song. And it’s pretty fun, it’s awesome.

Lemke: Yeah. 

Twitchell: The live stuff kinda changes for whatever the event calls for. One of those shows that I’m talking about was the last time we played Norman Music Festival. Instead of doing our crazy, psychedelic light show we try to provide, we just threw up a couple flood lamps, punk-rocked our entire set and got off the stage, to get out of the way for the other bands. If this is something we can really take our time and set up for, we’ll do it to the click and we’ll do it really trippy and we’ll get the entire rig going. That’ll change the style of our set we do.

Harris: But our sweet spot is the mid-tempo rock songs.

Twitchell: Uh-huh.

Lemke: Yeah.

Harris: It’s the best way to make room for textures and for things outside of a normal rock song. Seems like the faster you go, the less space you have to wedge sounds into.

OKS: How do you guys feel going from the EP to now? I listened to “Arms” again after I’d listened to the new one, and it struck me pretty obviously as a longer, more cohesive, better-developed album. There was more of everything — it was longer, there were more textures, the atmosphere was larger, y’know?

Harris: We used the gap between “Arms” and ... we spent a long time making goofy pop songs with drum machines, and that spiraled into the idea of a more post-punk, shoegazey sound. From that point, everything was different. We were able to start from right there. It’s bigger and beefier now because what we found was our zone. It was our spot, sonically.

OKS: So do you guys really feel like you’ve hit your stride?

Harris: I think, sonically, yeah. We sound fucking awesome.

You do spend a lot of time, and people get bogged down chasing all these sounds, but we’re at a point where we have a sound that I love, and everything we do now — like if I buy a new pedal at a pawn shop or something — that just adds to the sound. We’re definitely at a place where we’re less likely to toss things out moving forward, and more likely to build on what we’re doing.

Twitchell: Yeah, I think we have a reference point now, for our band and what we can achieve, despite pretty much any obstacle. We don’t have a bass player when we play shows, and that’s pretty amazing in itself. We talked about it the other night: How far does the rabbit hole go for this band? How far can we dig and just go, figuring out new ways to interpret our thoughts.

OKS: That was a thought that occurred to me when I was listening to the record. Sometimes I was like, “Is there a bass in here?” and others I knew, but I also was curious since [Lemke and Harris] both play guitar.

Harris: There’s a lot, both bass synthesizer and bass guitar all over. You gotta have that low end. It sounds awesome. That’s another one of those things that you don’t necessarily think about, but if somebody hit the mute button, it’d just be gone. You’d notice for sure.

OKS: What are your plans for touring on this album?

Harris: Just a little bit. Right now we’re going to do the two shows we have coming up in Norman, and then we’re going to St. Louis and Chicago the two days after our CD-release show. And then when we get back, I’ve got a vacation with my wife for our anniversary, so I’ll be gone for a while. And then we’ll be back in the spring.

By that time, we’ll see what’s happening promotion-wise with the album. I’ve got somebody working on it while I’ll be gone. Hopefully, we’ll come back and it’ll be like, “Oh, hey, while you were outta the country all these awesome bloggers said really sweet things about the album, so let’s go on tour.”

OKS: Are you guys in touch with a bunch of bloggers?

Harris: I do a version of promoting and publicity through Nice People with a mailing list and press releases, stuff like that. I think you can look out with social networking and blow up without [traditional promotion], but I think 99 percent of the bands I know like that had a publicist.

OKS: Or they’re just exceptionally good at doing it themselves.

Harris: Yeah, and that’s fucking hard. I mean, it really is. Having done it for all the releases on the label, even just putting together a press release and sending it out the first time is hard, and then dealing with following up and all that stuff, it’s real, real hard work.

Lemke: It’s a full-time gig.

Harris: And, the reality is that the people who get paid to do it are better than you no matter how good you are at it. Because they’re professionals. Hopefully when I go out of town, I’ll return to some buzz.

Depth & Current will play their CD-release show Thursday at Opolis. You can like them on Facebook and follow them on Twitter.
by Matt Carney 12.08.2011 2 years ago
at 09:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

VOTD: Tip of the ‘Spear’

Gentle Ghost gets gory.

For starters: How badass a song title is “Spearherder”?

I guarantee you the song and its new, blood-spattered video from Delo Creative match the furious, guttural tone the name suggests. Tyler Huskerson does his best Explosions in the Sky impression and Sethy McCarroll emotes in an impressive range of groans and grunts.

Also, it’s good to see Blake Studdard (he plays the keys and extra percussion on the right) back and rocking again after his old band, The Neighborhood, provided a spirited Norman Music Festival 4 set.

This installment in Delo Creative’s Be Nice To Your Kids series (BNTYK, for short) falls nicely in the category of Full-Scale-Apocalyptic Guitar Onslaughts. Watch:



Rumor has it Delo’s got another, gorier video on the way for a second new Gentle Ghost song. Tough to imagine it’ll top this, but I’ve got my fingers crossed. Excellent work all around, everyone.
by Matt Carney 01.03.2012 2 years ago
at 12:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

VOTD: You’ve got a little something on your, ah, everywhere …

Gentle Ghost: back and bloodier than ever!

Gentle Ghost’s continuing collaboration with Delo Creative on the “Be Nice to Your Kids” video series has yielded not one, but two (!) visual accompaniments for new songs. Check out “Dark Parts,” a nuanced, five-minute track that changes pace a couple different times and has a cool “cut out the heart” lyric, apropos for all the dried blood that’s all over the place.


This one doesn’t include a keyboard and is a little less urgent than “Spearherder,” which we first heard last week, but the songwriting has a bit stronger, more present narrative to it, I think. Watch:

by Matt Carney 01.10.2012 2 years ago
at 10:10 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

OKS Chatter: Matt Moran

The singer for new Altus band The Typist chats about keeping up with music culture in southwest Oklahoma.

It’s tough work doing everything yourself.

Living in Altus, the post-pop-punkers known as The Typist do a lot of music-related things themselves (read on for more about that), and that includes purchasing and operating their own recording equipment. Turns out, they did that quite well.

There’s a lot of enthusiasm in “Midwestern High Life”’s 10 tracks — specifically, the big-rock keyboard melodies, but also in the earnest, aggressively sung and shouted lyrics that mourn busted-up relationships and reconcile the future against the prospect of leaving where you grew up and fell in love (see: “Midwest”).

Singer Matt Moran was nice enough to answer a few questions about the birth of his band and what it’s like recording music in a place like Altus. Read on, and be sure to give “Midwestern High Life” a listen, below.

The Typist plays The Conservatory tomorrow night with Frank Smith and O Fidelis.

OKS: How did you guys set up this show with Frank Smith and O Fidelis?

Matt Moran: We’ve got a little bit of a history playing The Conservatory with old bands. I was also in a band that played with O Fidelis at the benefit for the UCO Jazz Lab a little while back. That’s how we got that going.

OKS: What other bands have you guys played in?

Moran: Our bassist, Patrick [Bellamy], and I were in You’d Prefer an Astronaut, which was a post-rock band that was in the vein of This Will Destroy You-type music. I’ve been in a few older punk bands from a waaaaay that played Conservatory. It was a pretty youth-punk-type deal.

How did The Typist come to be?

Moran: I’d been in and out of bands, and I started doing stuff on my own. I’d been doing it for a while and I decided, "Y’know, I should probably start recording and playing new songs for people." So I recorded a short little EP — five songs, acoustic — but I realized that I was just meant to do the band thing. I got help from my friends Justin [Strickland, drummer] and Patrick, we started playing the songs and then decided we needed to write songs as a band, and get everybody involved. We came up with an album’s worth of material, so we decided to record it.

We were like, “Well, we can go to a studio and lay this down,” but we decided that we wanted to take the time we wanted to take and not be limited by studio money. So we threw all our money together, bought some recording gear and spent the last two and a half months recording it, day in and day out.

We didn’t even actually add our keyboard player — who’s my brother, Daniel [Moran] — until last month. He came in and laid down a lot of keyboard parts, and as soon as he was finished, we just looked at him and said, “You’ve got no option; you have to be in this band. You just completed it. You made everything sound twice as good.”

OKS: What did Daniel bring with his keyboard? Was he playing a lot of riff-type stuff, or what?

Moran: He was doing a lot of Hammond organ stuff. I happen to be a religious follower of Charles Gillingham of the Counting Crows, and my brother came in and did that type of thing. He nailed it.

OKS: Do you guys all live in Altus?

Moran: Yes, except for Daniel. He lives an hour north, in Elk City.

OKS: What are some of the challenges of living and recording down in the southwest?

Moran: I guess the biggest challenge is just playing as much as you can. Down here — most people don’t know this — we actually have a pretty good music scene. It has a very DIY aesthetic about it. Everything we do, living in Altus, we have to do everything ourselves. If we want to get a show together, it’s the old DIY thing of finding a place, renting it out, getting a sound system, getting everything together yourself, promoting it as much as you can, and trying to do all that.

We like to come up and play in the city as much as we can, because we feel like it’s one of the really good places to be. For so many reasons, we remain here, but we try to make the best of what we got. I think it instills a good work ethic into us.

OKS: What sorts of venues do you guys play in for shows in Altus?

Moran: We’ve done all sorts of shit. We usually rent empty halls out and put it on, but we’ve done house shows. I’ve done a show in a storage shed, which was actually a pretty fun time. We packed about 50 people into it.

OKS: That’s impressive. Do you guys have something like a record store down there?

Moran: We don’t have a record store, but we have a really awesome music store that’s actually helped us out a bunch. Our drummer works there, and they’ve really helped us out and backed us up.

OKS: How do you stay up with new music?

Moran: Largely the Internet. We’ve got friends who are way more into that than we are. I go to Size Records every time I’m in the city, but otherwise, we’ve got to keep up with it online.

OKS: Through the Internet, you’ve got just as much access as me at my desk or somebody in New York or whatever. Do you feel it’s a big enabler for you guys, like you have the same opportunity as anybody else?

Moran: Yes, definitely. That hits the nail on the head. It’s kind of an equalizer for us. It’s not like we can go up and socialize with people as much as we want to, or go to the places we want to go on a regular basis. We have to socialize and keep up with music online, then make the trip when we can. 

OKS: What are the biggest limitations in being physically removed from the music scene in OKC, where you’d like to be more involved?

Moran: Mainly, it puts a limit on the camaraderie you can have. It’s a small social network that we have, and you don’t get to connect with people as much as you like to. When you can’t have that regular connection, it makes it difficult.

OKS: How does that frustration factor into you guys’ music?

Moran: Because of the tighter circle, we all know each other — musically — really well. You’ve got limited resources and limited people to make things happen with, so you really get to know each other. You grow to be a family.

Our drummer, he’s an incredible drummer. When he tells me something, I know exactly where he’s coming from, what he’s talking about. There’s nothing that ever gets lost in translation from instrument to instrument, player to player, or whatever.

OKS: If you had to sit down and talk it out as a band, what band would you say informed your music directly?

Moran: Like our biggest influence? I’d have to say probably a band like Manchester Orchestra. Very direct rock ’n’ roll with Southern sound and a distinct keyboard.

OKS: Who wrote the lyrics? You?

Moran: Yeah, that was me. It was an interesting feeling to write all the lyrics for a record.

OKS: Had you never done that before?

Moran: I had, just mostly for my personal music before. Never with a band.

OKS: So were you apprehensive going into it?

Moran: It honestly did, because these other guys are really great musicians. I didn’t want to do them a disservice. I didn’t want them to walk away thinking, “This should change, that should change.”

OKS: Did anybody else in the band try to offer advice on the lyric-writing, or do they understand it to be your thing?

Moran: They leave it to me, but they’re very free with the advice on the vocal melodies.

Listen to The Typist’s first album, “Midwestern High Life,” below. You can download it for $5.


by Matt Carney 01.20.2012 2 years ago
at 09:10 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
 
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