Friday 25 Jul
 
 
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OKG Newsletter


Topic: twister

Twist off

Spring brings thunderstorms and the opportunity to pit your imbibing ability against Gary England’s most noted tropes. Here’s to chasing storms … with beer.


Food and Drink Features

Nathan Gunter
Get ready, Tornado Alley: It’s your time to shine.
 
Wednesday, April 6, 2011
wafite

Neither here nor there

Three CDs that are marginally related to OKC

The music the Gazette receives falls mostly into three categories: local, locally connected and national. Metro music runs in the paper, while national releases generally are reviewed online. The middle category often falls through the cracks. Not today, however.  

W.A. Fite lives in Dallas, but he’s signed to the Dallas/OKC record label Hand Drawn Records. His “Poisoning the Medicine Tree” is an album of gritty electronic pop with a modern-rock singer over it. He follows a less-traveled path through electronic music: This is not the subtle indie pop of The Postal Service, the sunshiny pop of Owl City, or dance-oriented electro. This is forceful, rock-oriented, electronic music that sort of sounds like the pseudo-electronic experiments of Bush (“Glycerine”), thanks to both the vocals and the song structures. “Beating Thomas Best” and “Jack” are immediate standouts, while the mellower “Carney’s Lake” kicks off the quieter, more experimental back half. “That Ain’t the Way” is a piano rumination, showing his diversity.

Tulsa modern rock band Burn Halo’s latest, “Up from the Ashes,” is not bad, as far as modern rock goes. The strict constraints of the genre still apply, but the production tones down the shrieking treble that makes other releases in the genre so earsplitting. The resulting mix is heavy on low-end of everything: Even the snares sound like almost like toms. The acoustic intro to “Threw It All Away” results in a better-than-average power ballad. (To the naysayers: Yes, it’s still a power ballad.) The band has toured with Avenged Sevenfold, Buckcherry, Papa Roach and Halestorm. The album drops June 28.

Hailing from Okemah, Shawna Russell’s hot-country sound would fit in neatly with now-Okie Miranda Lambert and Taylor Swift, if Swift had a bit more muscular voice. Russell has a strong, mid-range one, and she uses it to the fullest on her self-titled, sophomore debut, which was recorded in OKC and Nashville. The album won’t convert any non-country fans, but Twister listeners will find much to love in her midtempo tunes.  



While you’re here, grab these free MP3s:

1. Hearts” — I Break Horses. You know that dream where you’re flying above the ocean and you’re awestruck instead of terrified?
2. Constellating” — James and Evander. The first band I’ve heard that lives up to a Postal Service comparison, because it has its own spin.
3. The First Time I Saw Jupiter” — Fall on Your Sword. Exactly the type of grounded, arresting electronic music I would expect from a former member of LCD Soundsystem.
4. “World’s Entire” — Kay Kay and His Weathered Underground. I’ve often wondered what “Pet Sounds” would sound like if Brian Wilson grew up now.
5. “Everything Must Spin” — Ryan Driver. Including your head, when you hear this dizzying acoustic track.
by Stephen Carradini 06.13.2011 3 years ago
at 12:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

City folk

Long known for a rat problem, New York City can be proud of its recent infestation. That’d be alt-folk act Country Mice.


Music

Joshua Boydston
Country mice
9:53 p.m. Saturday
Blue Note Lounge
2408 N. Robinson
thebluenotelounge.com, 600-1166
$5

 
Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Bovine in the breeze

Good food and fun in an informal restaurant on OU’s south research campus.


Restaurant Reviews

Doug Hill
First, let’s get one thing straight: Cows do not fly. They don’t normally anyway, unless there’s an aircraft, high explosives or wind-assist from Mother Nature. The Flying Cow Cafe serves the impressive National Weather Center complex on the University of Oklahoma campus immediately southeast of the Lloyd Noble Center. It’s named for a memorable scene in the 1996 movie “Twister.”
 
Wednesday, October 26, 2011

Take Shelter

Your forecast for ‘Take Shelter’: sustained tension with a 100 percent chance of palpable unease. Armpit precipitation possible.


Drama

Rod Lott
Rain the color and viscosity of fluids found in barrels at Jiffy Lube falls from the sky in the opening moments of “Take Shelter,” serving as a dark harbinger of things to come. Right out of the gate, this act of weird weather alerts the audience that something bad is going to happen, and the calm before the storm will be anything but serene.
 
Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Take Shelter

The thinking man’s ‘Twister’ is one of last year’s underseen gems.


Drama

Rod Lott
Rain the color and viscosity of fluids found in barrels at Jiffy Lube falls from the sky in the opening moments of the indie drama “Take Shelter,” serving as a dark harbinger of things to come.
 
Wednesday, February 1, 2012

The Sooner seen

Although some 1,333 miles lay between Oklahoma City and Hollywood, you wouldn’t know it from the looks of a new exhibit celebrating the Sooner State’s contributions to cinema.


Visual Arts

Phil Bacharach
Oklahoma @ the Movies
daily
Oklahoma History Center
800 Nazih Zuhdi
okhistory.org
521-2491
$4-$7
 
Wednesday, May 16, 2012

We were framed

As long as movies have existed, the state has been a part of them, as the book ‘Shot in Oklahoma’ lovingly details.


Features

Rod Lott

John Wooley
2 p.m. Saturday
Barnes & Noble Booksellers
6100 N. May
bn.com
843-9300

 
Wednesday, May 18, 2011

Friends in litigious places


CFN

Gazette staff
Did you know that tornadoes are so prevalent around these here parts that they often appear in the guise of country music superstars? According to a lawsuit filed by Lisa Sanderson, Garth Brooks’ business partner of 20 years, we have an F5 cyclone residing in this very state.
 
Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Dispatches from a disaster


News

Tim Farley
Adam Johnston had never seen a tornado until Monday. Now, he’s ready to move back to California.
 
Tuesday, May 21, 2013
 
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