Wednesday 16 Apr
 
 
ACM@UCO Program Button photo ACMUCO-Program-Button_zps0d616525.jpg

 

OKG Newsletter


Topic: wikileaks

Page One: Inside The New York Times

All the news that’s fit to shoot about all the news that’s fit to print.


Documentary

Rod Lott
Startling admission: As a career-long journalist in one form or another, it is difficult for me to be truly objective about the documentary “Page One: Inside The New York Times.”
 
Monday, October 10, 2011

Manning up


CFN

Gazette staff
This year’s Nobel Peace Prize nominations are in, and at least one native Oklahoman is on the list: Army Pfc. Bradley Manning.
 
Wednesday, March 7, 2012

‘Collateral’ soldier

An initial responder to the controversial New Baghdad helicopter assault shares his experience in an OKC appearance.


News

Clifton Adcock
7 P.M. MONDAY
CHURCH OF THE OPEN ARMS
3131 N. PENNSYLVANIA
525-9555
 
Wednesday, April 4, 2012

Cracking the code

How did Bradley Manning go from small-town Oklahoman to WikiLeakes’ most notorious contributor and alleged traitor?


News

Ben Fenwick
In the Logan County town of Crescent, some 30 miles north of Oklahoma City, Mark Radford was mowing his lawn when federal agents from the State Department and the U.S. Army showed up at his door. They asked Radford about a local kid he used to know, Bradley Manning.
 
Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Profile of courage


Letters to the Editor

Jackie Schmid
I greatly appreciate Bradley Manning’s courage and efforts to shed light on U.S. government actions (News, “Cracking the code,” Ben Fenwick, June 26, Oklahoma Gazette). Despite his challenging childhood, I believe he was sincerely motivated to bring about positive change for us and the rest of the world.
 
Wednesday, July 3, 2013

Irony Man


CFN

Gazette staff
It was a “good news, bad news” sort of verdict for Bradley Manning, the former U.S. Army private convicted of multiple charges stemming from his release of 700,000 classified documents to WikiLeaks. While the Crescent native was acquitted of the most serious charge of “aiding the enemy,” a military judge still found him guilty of 20 charges that potentially could mean more than 130 years in prison. Still, an “aiding the enemy” conviction could have meant life in prison, so he’s got that going for him.
 
Wednesday, August 7, 2013
 
Close
Close
Close