Wednesday 23 Apr
 
 
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OKG Newsletter


Topic: woody guthrie
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SXSW: Tate Music Group/Variance Showcase

A widely varied showcase, from hip-hop to hard rock to singer/songwriter

 The final event at The Buffalo Lounge was a Tate Music Group/Variance showcase. After treating listeners to a swanky food spread and free drinks, the music kicked off with Michelle Buzz. Buzz's piano-based singer/songwriter tunes fit in very neatly next to staples of the genre like Fiona Apple and Michelle Branch. Her stage presence was very pleasant and inviting, as she talked comfortably to the audience between songs. She's very young (still in college), so she has a long songwriting career ahead of her if she keeps on. 

Justin Cross played next, bringing some acoustic folk to the room. He caught my eye by rocking a Woody Guthrie t-shirt and a harmonica for a few tunes. His fingerpicking kept my ears tuned in. There's few things I like more than a good fingerpicked acoustic guitar, and Cross, along with his second guitarist, kept me pleased. Even when his set veered toward poppier grounds, the songs were still quite strong. 

Scarlitt Redemption's pop/rock set was a contrast with hard rock act We the People, which followed. The former employed five people, the latter just two. Scarlitt had a relatively static stage presence, letting their music do the heavy lifting; the guitarist for We the People headbanged, swung his hair, and moved about. Scarlitt's set was heavy on hummable melodies, while We the People went for heavy riffs and pounding rhythms. Their disparate sounds created a diversity in the lineup that I thought wouldn't be able to be continued.

That is, until Snorlaxx took the stage. Snorlaxx is a hip-hop act from Tulsa that consists of two bassists, a drummer, a rapid-fire rapper and and another absent member. ("He's in China," the rapper said, "with his cat General Meow.") I love bass, rhythm and hip-hop, so I was stoked as soon as I heard what they were about. And as soon as I actually heard them, I was hooked. Their bassists play off each other, making complex, melodically interesting constructions for the rapper to go nuts over. And he takes their energy and feeds it back, barking, speaking and shouting his way through the raps as if his life depended on it. 

The crowd swelled with every song they played; people were coming in the door even in the last song of their two-song encore (one band was unable to make their set, leaving extra time for Snorlaxx after people yelled for them to keep playing). The members could have played longer, time-wise, but they had run out of material. They performed everything they had written in their set, and they left everything they had on stage. The guys bounced around the stage like pinballs, with the rapper occasionally leaving the stage to work his words in the audience. 

It was an electrifying set, and it left me wanting more. Snorlaxx is on to something, and I suggest you hear what it is they're on to before everyone else does. It was an incredibly fitting end to The Buffalo Lounge at SXSW. More please!

by Stephen Carradini 03.18.2011 3 years ago
at 10:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Picture of horror

A century later, the photograph of an Oklahoma lynching still resonates.


News

Rob Collins
The graphic image began as a photograph, then a postcard. It appeared in a book, inspired a folk song and was exhibited at a New York art gallery.
 
Tuesday, May 24, 2011

Celtic pride

Dropkick Murphys are honored to have audiences shout along to their raucous, Irish-punk anthems.


Music

Joshua Boydston
Dropkick Murphys with The Tossers and The Cobra Skulls
6:30 P.m. Wednesday
Diamond Ballroom, 8001 S. Eastern
diamondballroom.net, 677-9169
$24
 
Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Elitism for dummies


Commentary

Kurt Hochenauer
Is Oklahoma’s higher education establishment elitist?
 
Wednesday, August 24, 2011

It’s almost like ‘Being There’

Missed Wilco’s last appearance at Cain’s, too? Worry not — the set streams on their website.

Wilco’s March 8, 2008, performance at Cain’s Ballroom during my freshman year of college changed my life.

Known for workmanlike shows, Jeff Tweedy — looking fly in a white suit stitched with roses and a cardinal — and company rocked 29 songs in about three hours, ranging from the guitar-oriented tracks off their then-new “Sky Blue Sky” LP to “Summerteeth”’s many pop classics, super-old material (”Forget the Flowers” from 1996’s “Being There”), a slew of Woody Guthrie covers, and all the best work on their experimental Americana opus “Yankee Hotel Foxtrot.” That show is the reason I’m typing this sentence right now.

Anyhoo, if you’re an idiot like me and had to leave town the weekend of the band’s glorious May 8 return to Tulsa, then you can stop punching yourself in the head and go to Wilco’s website, where you can stream the show in its entirety. There are only 22 songs this time, but they look to be a pretty good balance of the group’s catalogue. “Jesus, Etc.” is a standout sing-along here, moving Tweedy to declare it “top-5, all-time.” Enjoy.


by Matt Carney 08.29.2011 2 years ago
at 03:35 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Soundcheck: 'This Machine'

OCCJ adopts the message of Oklahoma's greatest folk singer to fight injustice.


Music

Matt Carney
Woody Guthrie didn’t die in 1967.
 
Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Terra Lightfoot — Terra Lightfoot

This dream-folk debut will induce dead sleep.


Folk

Matt Carney
As the common people have progressed over the last 50-plus years, so has the topicality of their music. Since the development of genres in popular music in the 1950s, contemporary folk music has skewed apolitical, alluring and beautiful.
 
Thursday, October 20, 2011

Hear this

 
Wednesday, December 7, 2011

Home in the ‘Oklahoma Hills’

Tulsa foundation buys the Woody Guthrie Archives; plans to open a display in that city.


CFN

Gazette staff
Nearly a centennial past his birth, one of Oklahoma’s most famed sons is finally “Bound for Glory” back in his native state.
 
Wednesday, December 28, 2011

Lynne her your ears

After more than two decades in the business, sometimes Shelby Lynne feels like she’s only just now got the hang of it.


Music

Matt Carney

Shelby Lynne
8 p.m. Thursday
The Blue Door
2805 N. McKinley
bluedoorokc.com
524-0738
$40

 
Wednesday, January 25, 2012
 
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