Thursday 31 Jul
 
 

 

OKG Newsletter


Topic: vod

42

A solid hit.


Drama

Phil Bacharach
In chronicling the real-life tale of Jackie Robinson, who broke Major League Baseball’s color barrier in 1947 when he joined the Brooklyn Dodgers, 42 is schmaltzy, sentimental and shameless. There is no dabbling in highfalutin niceties like subtext or nuance. Writer-director Brian Helgeland, who penned the hardly simplistic L.A. Confidential, keeps his focus simple and is content to let his hero worship fly.
 
Tuesday, July 23, 2013

The To Do List

Even if it only has S-E-X on its mind, this isn’t your ordinary gross-out comedy.


Comedy

Aimee Williams
Let’s talk about sex. Specifically, how absurd sex can be.
 
Friday, July 26, 2013

Starbuck

A sitcom premise with spunk.


Comedy

Rod Lott
Thanksgiving brings Vince Vaughn's Delivery Man to theaters, but you can see it now, more or less, in Starbuck, the 2011 French dramedy that serves as the source material for the American remake.
 
Tuesday, July 30, 2013

The Canyons

True to its title, the film is a void.


Drama

Rod Lott
Paul Schrader’s The Canyons opens and closes with a montage of abandoned movie theaters. For this film in particular, that choice strikes one as symbolic in several ways: not only as a comment on the state of the industry, but on the state of The Canyons itself. You’re unlikely to find many 2013 films this empty.
 
Tuesday, July 30, 2013

The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec

‘Extraordinary,’ indeed!


Action

Rod Lott
How ironic that un film par Luc Besson — the Frenchman behind such action smashes as the Taken and The Transporter series, among others — would fail to play American theaters, yet that’s what happened with The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec. The 2010 adventure finally sees the light of day on these shores from Shout! Factory; its absence from our multiplexes is not indicative of its quality.
 
Wednesday, July 31, 2013

The Guillotines

Not very sharp.


Action

Rod Lott
Everyone knows — or they do now — that the greatest gimmick in the history of martial-arts movies is the titular weapon of Master of the Flying Guillotine. Therefore, one could surmise that the more retractable blades whizzing through the air, the better, right?
 
Thursday, August 1, 2013

Olympus Has Fallen

And it can't get up!


Action

Rod Lott
As Aaron Eckhart grows angry and Morgan Freeman pulls strings from the sidelines, a possibly crazy but altogether decent man dishes out some superheroic justice to save the city. The result is an excellent movie, arguably the best of the year.
 
Saturday, August 3, 2013

My Amityville Horror

Arguably better than most of the sequels (and definitely the remake).


Documentary

Rod Lott
Daniel Lutz doesn't like people to know he's one of the children who lived through The Amityville Horror — as Jay Anson's best-selling book and subsequent smash movie called it — and yet here he is, front and center for an entire documentary on that "unfortunate gift." Be glad he gave in; My Amityville Horror is an occasionally gripping portrait of a middle-aged man still coming to terms with a terrible childhood.
 
Wednesday, August 7, 2013

Errors of the Human Body

What sci-fi should be.


Sci-Fi

Rod Lott
It's too easy to compare Errors of the Human Body to the "body horror" entries on David Cronenberg's CV — too easy because it's all too apt. As much as it brings that master director to mind, the new film is original enough to stand on its own terms.
 
Wednesday, August 7, 2013

Hatchet III

Ax and ye shall receive.


Horror

Rod Lott
Hatchet III posits that a man whose face has been turned to raw meat can get right back up and walk around as if nothing happened. Then he gets chainsawed into even halves, yet even that fails to faze him.
 
Wednesday, August 7, 2013
 
Close
Close
Close