Sunday 20 Apr
 
 
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OKG Newsletter


Topic: free

Every Night the Trees Disappear: Werner Herzog and the Making of Heart of Glass

News flash: Herzog film shoots are unconventional.


Nonfiction

Rod Lott
By the off chance you read Alan Greenberg’s Every Night the Trees Disappear nearly 40 years ago this new, retooled, hardcover edition from Chicago Review Press is the one to get. It’s unlike any behind-the-scenes film book you’ve ever read.
 
Monday, May 7, 2012

The Perfect Family

Even if her movie does not, Kathleen Turner shines as the moralistic matriarch at the head of 'The Perfect Family.'


Drama

Rod Lott
The Perfect Family
5:30 and 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday
Oklahoma City Museum of Art
415 Couch
okcmoa.com
236-3100
$5-$8
 
Wednesday, May 9, 2012

Hud home

Hudson Moore found the country stage, not college, to be his calling.


Music

Joshua Boydston
Spring Jam with Hudson Moore, Casey Donahew Band, Sunny Ledfurd and The Damn Quails
5:30 p.m. Saturday
Wormy Dog Saloon
311 E. Sheridan
wormydog.com
601-6276
$22-$25
 
Wednesday, May 9, 2012

Prairie potter

A new exhibition pays tribute to Frankoma Pottery, an Oklahoma company that produced highly collectible ceramics for half a century.


Visual Arts

Mia Cantu
Oklahoma Clay: Frankoma Pottery
through Sept. 16
Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art
555 Elm, Norman
ou.edu/fjjma
325-3272
$3-$5
 
Wednesday, May 9, 2012

Rather chilling

While the temperature’s rising, Vacationer’s transporting your ears and mind to a cooler place. Bon voyage!


Music

Joshua Boydston
Vacationer with Tennis and Eureeka!
9 p.m. Thursday
Opolis
113 N. Crawford, Norman
opolis.org
820-0951
$10-$12
 
Wednesday, May 9, 2012

Chug along

With 11 albums and 1,000-plus shows behind it, Last Train Home pulls into town to deliver more folk rock.


Music

Joshua Boydston

Last Train Home
7 p.m. Friday
The Blue Door
2805 N. McKinley
bluedoorokc.com
524-0738
$15-$20

 
Wednesday, May 9, 2012
bousman

R&R Q&A with Darren Lynn Bousman

The director discusses a not-so-happy ‘Mother’s Day.’

Best known for directing Saw II through IV, Darren Lynn Bousman has two movies out right now with the near-simultaneous home-video release of Mother’s Day and 11-11-11. Missed them in theaters? So did most of America, and here’s why ...

R&R: Do you miss those Saw weekends, where those huge grosses come in? Because these two movies, unfortunately, haven't enjoyed a wide theatrical release. And I think Mother's Day certainly deserved one.

Bousman: Please put that in your write-up! Mother's Day is a sad story — a very sad story. It was a movie that tested through the roof, that I thought was going to put me back on the map in a big way, and it didn't get released. There are many reasons why — part of it had to do with subject matter, part of it had to do with distribution fumbles, part of it had to do with bank issues — one thing after another after another.

And it killed me. As an artist and filmmaker, you're proud of what you do and you want people to see it, but things happen and you've just got to deal with it. So I've sat on it for three years now, knowing no one would get to see it. I loved that Saw got released on 3,000 screens and everyone wanted to see the movie.

That said, I've kind of got a new avenue to vent my frustrations in that we're doing, that's called The Devil's Carnival. I'm self-distributing it, and basically, it's kind of an “F you” to The Man who sits up there and says, "Your movie has to X, Y and Z, or no one's going to see it."

I just don't believe that. I was told that Repo! The Genetic Opera was a non-commercial movie that nobody wanted to see, and we went out touring the country with it and found our audience. We assembled an army.

Same with Devil's Carnival. We ourselves are putting it in theaters. It will be in more theaters than my last three movies combined. We're selling out every single night, the lines wrap around blocks, and it's an awesome feeling to take control back and see that there is an audience. It's not as simple as just putting a trailer out — you have to find them, 100 percent literally. We're driving thousands of miles across the U.S. and Canada, stopping into these theaters and making friends for life.

I'm still very proud of Mother's Day. I just wish that more filmmakers would do this, to show that … Mother's Day didn't have to die. It could show in 200 theaters the same way as Devil's Carnival. If Devil's Carnival, which is a little rock opera and not mainstream at all, could sell out these theaters in these cities, then Mother's Day, which is much more commercial and mainstream, could as well. I hope people will find it on DVD and embrace it.

R&R: I hope they will, too, because I thought you got a terrific performance out of Rebecca De Mornay.

Bousman:
I agree. It was one of those things that just clicked. I jokingly said to her numerous times, hopefully not insulting her, "This is your John Travolta in Pulp Fiction." Because that movie put him back on the map. It's a shame more people aren't getting to see her as Mother — she's beyond fantastic.

R&R: Does it bother you that your name may be forever linked with the Saw movies, no matter what you do, no matter what you might make in the future?

Bousman: It's cool, it's fine. Saw gave me my start. They believed in me when no one else did. That's forever part of me, and I wear that badge with pride. That said, I think what I'm doing now surpasses that. The reality is, I just showed up for Saw. Regardless of whether I made a good movie or a bad movie, it would open on 3,000 screens and went on to make a lot of money.

Now, I think I made good Saw films. I'm proud of the work I did. But the reality is, I showed up. I was lucky. I think right now, this challenging the system — the way people perceive movies have to be put out. We have no publicity team on this movie. It's Twitter and Facebook. I've learned never to be complacent again, to let a movie go into obscurity. If I believe in a movie, I will pick it up and I will do the fight.  

R&R: Have you given up on other offers, or are you determined to do only your own projects from here on out?

Bousman: Listen, I am ready and willing to sell out, 100 percent. I would love to do another big studio movie. Nothing would make me happier. But the reality is, the movies that speak to me are very unconventional. And I've found a niche that drives me. So the question is, will they let me make another movie? I hope so. But I'm not going to sit around and wait. I'll keep making things that inspire me.

R&R: You seem to be perfectly happy to stay working in the horror genre. Do you have a desire to venture outside that world?

Bousman: I'm writing an action script right now, basically a thriller. I'd like to journey outside, but I don't think I'm ever going to go that far away from it. I love the macabre, I love the dark, I love the twisted. —Rod Lott

Hey! Read This:
11-11-11 DVD review 
Mother’s Day Blu-ray review  
Saw 3D Blu-ray review 



by Rod Lott 05.09.2012 1 year ago
at 08:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Ted, white and blue

Watch out, Oklahoma City! Ted Nugent’s on his way, and you don’t want to be caught in the classic rocker’s crosshairs.


Music

Matt Carney
Ted Nugent with REO Speedwagon and Styx
6:40 p.m. Friday
OKC Zoo Amphitheatre
2011 N.E. 50th
zooamp.com
364-3700
 
Wednesday, May 9, 2012

Tim & Eric's Billion Dollar Movie

Great job!


Comedy

Rod Lott
When a movie's opening-credits logos are funny, you're in for quite a trip. Tim & Eric's Billion Dollar Movie is indeed a trip — an acid one, to be precise. Whether it's good or bad depends entirely on your acceptance of ... oh, to pick a scene at random, a character held against his will in a bathtub being filled with the diarrhea of four children.
 
Tuesday, May 8, 2012

Parker Millsap and Michael Rose — Palisade


Folk

Joshua Boydston
Fledgling singer-songwriter and Purcell native Parker Millsap builds quite a foundation with stand-up bassist Michael Rose on their debut, Palisade. From the sounds of it, a monumental career is in the works.
 
Wednesday, May 9, 2012
 
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