Tuesday 22 Jul
 
 
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OKG Newsletter


Topic: Film

Call Me Bwana

Bob Hope goes to Africa in a minor, mindless comedy.


Comedy

Rod Lott
From the producers of the 007 franchise comes 1963's "Call Me Bwana," a harmless, near-pointless spy spoof starring, of all people, Bob Hope.
 
Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Oblivion

Cowboys and aliens, minus about $97,500,000.


Sci-Fi

Rod Lott
So many reasons exist to see “Oblivion,” a 1994 genre mishmash now seeing a long-overdue release courtesy of Shout! Factory. Here’s why:
 
Thursday, July 7, 2011

Take Me Home Tonight

More than just a great soundtrack.


Comedy

Rod Lott
If your mind reads the title "Take Me Home Tonight" and immediately follows it up with "I don't wanna let you go till you see the light," you're a part of the audience most likely to enjoy this movie.
 
Monday, July 11, 2011

Arthur

When you get caught between the moon and New York City, you're screwed.


Comedy

Rod Lott
If there's one good thing in the failed remake of "Arthur," it's that Hollywood can stop trying to make a leading man out of Russell Brand and move on to someone else.
 
Tuesday, July 12, 2011

French this


OKG7 things to do

Gazette staff
Catch any number of French films playing as part of French Cinema Week at Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch.
 
Wednesday, July 13, 2011

All down the line

“Finish Line Films” kicked off with a screening of “Apollo 13.”


Features

Ryan Querbach

Thursday, Saturday, ongoing

 
Wednesday, July 13, 2011

13 Assassins

Samurai! Samurai! Samurai!


Action

Rod Lott
Proof that "13 Assassins" isn't your everyday Takashi Miike film: The opening scene depicts a man committing hara-kiri, and just as the sword is about to be inserted into his stomach, the director cuts away.
 
Friday, July 15, 2011

Within / The Dead and the Damned

‘Damned’ if you do.


Horror

Rod Lott
I love horror films far more than most people, but I do not, as some accuse, love them all blindly. In fact, two new to DVD are among the worst I’ve seen in the year thus far.
 
Friday, July 15, 2011

Welcome to Rod & Reel!

Not about fishing.

Welcome to Rod & Reel, the Gazette’s first-ever blog covering film, television and video — all the stuff we can’t fit in print, whether local, national or international.

Those of you who’ve arrived here via a Google search, seeking info and tips on fishing, apologies. (But, hey, have you seen “Okie Noodling”?) —Rod Lott

by Rod Lott 07.15.2011 3 years ago
at 10:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
tekken

R&R Q&A with Dwight Little

The 'Tekken' director talks!

Based on the video game franchise, the live-action “Tekken” debuts Tuesday on Blu-ray and DVD. It’s directed by Dwight Little, whose work includes such films as “Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers,” “Marked for Death” with Steven Seagal, “Rapid Fire” with Brandon Lee, “Murder at 1600” with Wesley Snipes and “The Phantom of the Opera” with Robert Englund.

R&R: It’s been a while since you’ve done a feature film. You’ve been working a lot in TV, so why “Tekken”? What brought you back?

Little: It was a chance to re-collaborate with Alan McElroy, the screenwriter, who I did "Halloween 4" and "Rapid Fire" with, and he and I have a great, common creative interest and rapport. I thought the “Tekken” world was a great platform for a martial arts movie. I had some success with "Marked for Death" and "Rapid Fire," and it looked like it was in my area of expertise.

R&R: Were you familiar with the games?

Little: Only in sort of a passing way. I wasn't like a hardcore player, but my two boys are into it, so I get into vicariously. There was a mythology about the family and the Tekken corporation I got inspired by, like you get inspired by a short story or a novel. I also love the ever-changing, interactive fight designs — those were so visually interesting to me. I thought it'd be a way to freshen up the genre of a martial arts action movie.

R&R: Did you approach it any different because it was a video game first?

Little: You look at the existing source material and find the thing that makes you passionate or gets you excited. I made the movie like I would make “Rocky” or “Gladiator” — the goal is to make a good movie, not a good video game. You have to commit to the characters to keep viewers actively committed to the story. Poppy visuals are not going to do it for 100 minutes. Alan and I said, "You know what? Jin and his devil wings, and the boxing kangaroo — let's leave that for a CGI or an anime movie. Let's leave these heavy supernatural items on the table."

R&R: Obviously, you were invested in it, so are you disappointed its theatrical release was so small?

Little: Sure, but that reflects the world we live in. This movie, made 10 years ago, obviously would have been released on 2,000 screens. To market and release a movie now nationally is a $35-to-$40-million commitment in marketing. “Iron Man” and those movies can support that, but there's only seven distributors now, effectively. The way that smaller movies come to the marketplace in an era of a digital world — it's exactly the same as the music business. Our world is changing so fast, but “Tekken” will be platformed on Blu-ray, on Redbox, on iTunes, on VOD and Netflix and pay-per-view, and that's how movies go into the world unless it's Warner Bros. and they have that massive marketing muscle. —Rod Lott

by Rod Lott 07.15.2011 3 years ago
at 10:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
 
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