Friday 11 Jul
 
 

 

OKG Newsletter


Topic: Festival

Capitol gains

Past, present and the future of the African-American community in Oklahoma are spotlighted during the Africa West culture and heritage festival.


Features

Charles Martin
Africa West
Saturday
Metro Tech Springlake Campus, 1900 Springlake Drive
Africawestokc.com, 427-4444
 
Wednesday, June 8, 2011

Folk hero

Those musicians influenced by Woody Guthrie will pay tribute to him at the annual folk festival that proudly bears his name.


Music

Joshua Boydston
Woody Guthrie Folk Festival featuring Jimmy LaFave, Stoney LaRue, Shawn Mullins and more
Wednesday-Sunday
Okemah
woodyguthrie.com 918-623-2440
Free
 
Wednesday, July 13, 2011

‘Off’ still on

Let’s twist again like we did last summer! Although its longtime venue is dead, Okie Twist-Off is very much alive.


Features

Charles Martin

Okie Twist-Off
Friday-Saturday
okietwistoff.com
$10-$15

 
Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Festi-full

Festivals abound throughout the fall season. Some of the many out-of-town events are quirky enough to justify a car trip.


Food and Drink Features

Charles Martin
Rural Oklahomans must harbor a love of the eccentric, as some of the most unusual events on fall’s calendar are in small towns across the state.
 
Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Hear this


OKG7 things to do

Gazette staff
A combination of nature and music will set the stage for the Stone River Music Festival.
 
Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Fantastic Fest: 10 things I hate about you

Because everyone loves a list, amiright?

This is a fun weekend, so much so that I wish I could clone myself to catch more screenings, and I'm already raring to come back in 2012. That said ...

10. The ticketing system is several levels too difficult.
9. Much of the audience is hygienically challenged.
8. Much of the audience is hygienically challenged.
7. Much of the audience is just as rude, loud and inconsiderate as regular moviegoers — just with better knowledge of obscure nude scenes and dragon sequences.
6. Much of the audience is hygienically challenged.
5. Despite hot Austin weather, the in-theater A/C isn't cranked as high as I'd like.
4. Much of the audience is hygienically challenged.
3. Much of the audience is hygienically challenged.
2. Most of the free T-shirts are black.
1. Much of the audience is hygienically challenged. And combined with No. 5, that's a recipe for ick. —Rod Lott
by Rod Lott 09.24.2011 2 years ago
at 02:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Fantastic Fest: 'Livid'

It may French-fry your mind.

Writers/directors Alexandre Bustillo and Julien Maury finally follow up their 2007 hit, "Inside," with another French horror film in "Livid." While not a sophomore slump, it doesn't pay off on their debut's promise. Most of that is because the new movie makes so little sense.

On one hand, that's good, because you're not quite sure what's going to happen next. On the other hand, when stuff does happen, you may ask yourself, "Qu'est-ce?"

Appealing young actress Chloé Coulloud is Lucie, a new home-care nurse being trained by a jaded veteran of elderly diaper-changing (Catherine Jacob, "Who Killed Bambi?"). On day one, the most memorable stop is that of the Jessel mansion, where a 100-year-old lives in a vegetative state by herself (credibility alert!) on the top floor. The pro tells the newbie of a rumored treasure somewhere within the massive estate.

After sharing this news with her frustrated boyfriend, Lucie find herself as part of a trio breaking into the place amid the witching hour to hunt for the riches. They find something else. If a senior citizen in an oxygen mask is the stuff of your nightmares, prepare to soil your drawers.

From there, the story unfolds in a manner audiences may not expect, but "Livid" becomes less lucid. The nonsense speeds up as the pacing slows to a near-crawl. I'm all for acts of the supernatural, but not without some context as to what is occurring before our eyes. Bustillo and Maury are unclear, perhaps in an attempt to be arty. The team pulls off some outstanding visuals, but ghost stories cannot work on those alone.

The title "Livid" has no proper connection to the movie's events; it's as if someone wanted a word that sounded like "Insidious." Now that's a flick that yielded fright while containing all other necessary ingredients. As for "Livid," let's chalk it up as a somewhat noble misfire. —Rod Lott
by Rod Lott 09.24.2011 2 years ago
at 02:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Fantastic Fest: Funny stuff

LOLin' at FF.

Movies aren't all dreary and eerie at this film festival. A few are pure comedies, and so far, I've caught two, neither from these United States.

First, "New Kids Turbo," a Danish delight about five slackers with mullets who are too lazy to get and/or keep a job, and welfare checks just don't support their beer-swillin' lifestyles, so they decide to stop paying for anything anymore. Not only does this attract the attention of the authorities, but the idea catches on with the recession-weary populace. Politically incorrect slapstick ensues, and the jokes are lobbed at rapid fire. The quintet of rude, crude losers breaks several rules of things you should never do in movies (i.e. kill the dog), but they get away with it and have you laughing all the way. Nothing gets lost in the translation.



And then there's Japan's "Karate-Robo Zaborgar," equally as silly and satisfying. This one's both an update and a spoof of a kiddie live-action series from yesteryear, à la "Ultraman," so the approach is both reverent and respectfully raunchy (think "The Brady Bunch Movie"). It's about the love story between a man and his fighting, transforming robot, and all the enemies they fight (or attempt to) along the way. One of them is Diarrhea Robot, so named because of ... well, you'll see when this hits USA DVD before long. —Rod Lott

by Rod Lott 09.25.2011 2 years ago
at 09:50 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
 
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