Tuesday 22 Jul
 
 
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OKG Newsletter


Topic: Flaming Lips

Fire good!

The mighty young guys of Mighty Big Fire make their brand of indie rock spark.


Music

Joshua Boydston
Mighty Big Fire with Peach and Shelton Pool
7-10 p.m. Saturday
Oklahoma City Museum Of Art
415 Couch
okcmoa.com 236-3100
$5
 
Wednesday, September 7, 2011

Alley oops


Letters to the Editor

John W. Hilmes
Let me see if I understand this (News, Clifton Adcock, “Walk the line,” Aug. 31, Gazette): MAPS 3 park subcommittee member Michelle Martin-Coyne, the wife of The Flaming Lips’ Wayne Coyne, wants to walk from Flaming Lips Alley to the proposed (Mick Cornett/ Larry Nichols park) Core to Shore park and the new convention center is in her way?
 
Wednesday, September 14, 2011

OKS Chatter: Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr.

The Detroit band talks Wayne Coyne, hip-hop beats, pop radio and Pitchfork.

The three best shows I saw at this year’s Austin City Limits Music Festival were two obvious choices (Kanye West, Arcade Fire) and one dark horse I’d pinned a lot of hope on. That band is Detroit’s Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr., and the duo’s Sunday-afternoon set showed off their flair for garish styles, fun-loving melodies, twinkling electronic textures, falsetto harmonizing, bubble machines and straight-up rock ’n’ roll. Also, they tossed Popsicles to a thankful crowd, heat-exhausted by three days of loud music in the Texas sun.

With those antics – the names, the games, the showmanship, these press photos  – it’s hard to tell whether or not Daniel Zott and Joshua Epstein have their tongues wriggling in their cheeks. Luckily, I had the chance to chat with them the day before their set, and the guys seem as genuine as the homegrown, preservative-free cheese I bought at Forward Foods during my lunch break yesterday.



My verdict: They’re ambitious, quirky guys who record weirdly lovable music and are nostalgic for a time when physical media was more important and radio stations crackled with music that was beautiful and challenging. But I’m rambling now. On to the chatting:

Zott: So what’s up with Wayne Coyne? He gets to do whatever he wants on a major label, and everyone loves him. It’s weird.

Epstein: He has like, three houses, right? Right in a row?

OKS: It’s actually four. He’s expanded. I think they’re all back-to-back, and connected by the backyard. It’s just a gigantic compound.

Epstein: That’s so weird.

OKS: It’s in the shady side of Oklahoma City, so the houses are probably pretty cheap. He’s spent a lot of money remodeling and redecorating them.

“Nothing but Our Love” at ACL 2011


Epstein: That’s awesome. Is he part of the community?

OKS: I see him at concerts all the time. There’s a venue in Norman called Opolis, where a lot of the smaller-name indie acts come through, and he’s there with friends and family at a lot of the shows I go to. He just walks right up to the stage, pulls out his phone and tweets photos. He’s checking out new bands and hanging around.

But on to you guys. One of the things I like so much about your music is that a lot of it’s textured with electronica — the little fizzly sounds that keep things going. How is that coming out of Detroit? It seems very different to me, from most of the music that comes out of there.

Music video for “Simple Girl”


Zott: You’re talking about the garage-rock scene.

OKS: Yeah, that’s usually what I think about when I hear about Detroit.

Zott: There’s that element, and we do have a rock element to our sound, but Detroit does have an electronic scene that’s really huge. It kinda started there.

Epstein: Yeah, techno music came from Detroit.

Zott: There’s a lot of bands doing that kinda stuff right now, and the roots are there for it. A lot of bands we like are electronic-type bands. It’s more natural than you think, there’s a lot of electronic tinkering going on up there.

Epstein: There’s a huge, underground hip-hop scene that’s getting notoriety also. I think hip-hop’s actually a big part of our music, too.

Zott: I’d say more so than electronica is a hip-hop type vibe. It’s a little bit warmer. There’s a groovier beat than a stale, 4-4 beat.

OKS: I definitely feel like – listening to you guys’ music – it’s more intimate and warm-sounding.

Zott: Yeah, there’s definitely some of that electronic texturing, but it’s Detroit to us.

OKS: You guys did the “Summer Babe” cover for The A.V. Club. Do you guys have a particular affinity for Pavement, or that song in particular?

Epstein: Well, the songs had to have “Summer” in the title, but I’ve always been a huge Pavement fan, so it seemed to be a pretty obvious choice.

Zott: And I hadn’t listened to them much. Usually when we do a cover or a remix or something like that, one of us has heard the song and the other hasn’t, so it makes it more fun because you can’t quite put as much of a spin on the song if you know it in and out. That’s really hard to do. I think we were able to get away from it because I wasn’t familiar. Josh kept the things that we needed to keep, but we also made it fresh.

OKS: Let me ask you guys about your album, particularly the Gil Scott-Heron cover, “We Almost Lost Detroit.” Did you guys pick that one out because you’re big fans of Gil Scott-Heron, or because of the hometown mention, or kind of a mix of both, or what?

“We Almost Lost Detroit” live on KEXP


Epstein: I think initially it was because of Detroit. We really liked the version we did. It felt updated, in comparison to the original. But also we really liked the sentiment in it. It sums up so much about our record, especially the name “It’s a Coporate World,” so it felt like we had to include it. It was just kinda meant to be.

OKS: Do you guys’ songs start out with words, or do you go melody first or what?

Zott: It’s different every time. I think the key is to keep it inspired and to avoid forcing anything. Sometimes Josh’ll have an idea and we’ll work it out, sometimes I’ll have an idea and we’ll work it out, sometimes we push something together, or sometimes we write a whole song and there’s no lyrics. Sometimes you need to make lyrics sound good. It’s different every time, I think.

OKS: If you guys had to record a pop album or a folk album, which one would you choose?

Zott: That’s where we’re kind of a mix. We want to be a pop band. We hate the idea that a pop band has to be dumbed-down — lyrically, sonically, chord structure-wise. It used to not be like that. “God Only Knows” was a massive hit worldwide, and that song has the weirdest chords in it, it has time-signature changes, a key change. It’s weird: It would never fly right now on pop-radio format.

God Only Knows:


OKS: It’s morbid, too.

Zott: Yeah! It was considered a beautiful love song, and it is. But it’s got these funky lyrics that aren’t typical love-song lyrics. But we think people can still digest that stuff, and people do. I’d like to write a pop album that breaks that rule. We’re just making music we love, that we think could be pop music and doesn’t necessarily have to be Top-40 radio. It can be complex. I think we’d do a pop record.

Epstein: To me, they both exist within me, and I don’t think I can separate them. I’ll still feel the need to write lyrics that are meaningful and challenging. You can do it. People just aren’t doing it in the Top 40 anymore. The system’s a bit broken. People at the radio stations want to keep their jobs. Radio plays a huge role to make bands visible to people who aren’t on blogs, who don’t seek out new things.

People who read Pitchfork fail to realize that most people in the world don’t read Pitchfork. I was working with this band, recording a song, and they were like, “Pitchfork’s gonna love this.” And I told them they were idiots. Do it because you love, not because Pitchfork’s gonna like it. They’re just one opinion, anyways. Somehow they’ve managed to make people think they’re the authority.

I just think that, ultimately, if it were DJs playing the songs they wanted to play, like it was in the ‘60s, then we’d have a much more diverse popular music scene. People are hungry for good stuff. That’s how Phoenix became a Top-40 band. I think mostly probably because it was so different when it played on those stations. People were like, “Holy crap! What is this? It’s not Nickelback!” y’know?

OKS: So are you guys going to get to go around at the fest at all? Who are you going to see?

Zott: If we have time, we’d love to see Stevie Wonder.

Epstein: As a musician, it’s really hard for me to go to a show and just be entertained. And when bands can do that, I’m always so blown away. Like going to a Flaming Lips show: You feel like a little kid and you just want to cry. I learn a lot from them.

Zott: I don’t go to concerts, which is kind of a weird thing. I guess I’m going to have to make up for it now.

Epstein: I go to too many. I played with OK Go one time, and they said something along the lines of, “Everything we do, we try to be like The Flaming Lips.”
by Matt Carney 09.28.2011 2 years ago
at 01:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

BEST OF OKC: People & Media

Here come your champions for 2011!

 
Wednesday, August 10, 2011

That’s like, a quarter of a day, man.

The Flaming Lips’ six-hour song to be released ... soon, we understand.

Warner Bros. Records announced yesterday that The Flaming Lips’ much-publicized, somewhat anticipated and sure-to-be-psychedelic, charitable, six-hour-long song, “Found a Star on the Ground,” will be released very soon. A press release said to stay tuned to the band’s website for information.

Also contained within the release was this odd little nugget:

“The song itself will be contained within a newly-developed mesmerizing toy, THE STROBO TRIP. This unique devise has been called ‘A Light & Audio Phase Illusions Toy’ to use used in conjunction with ‘Found A Star On The Ground’ to create a complete Lipsian happening to be enjoyed by yourself or with other interesting people or pets.”

It adds the following explanation, for context (one supposes):

“Honestly users, you'll just have to experience this multi-sensory phenomenon for yourselves to understand the concept.”

We appreciate your candidness in being incapable of explaining the inner workings of The Flaming Lips’ collective brain to the masses, Warner Bros.
by Matt Carney 10.04.2011 2 years ago
at 01:55 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Math test

After Oklahoma weather failed them, the men of Mutemath make a calculated move to bring their ‘Odd Soul’ to town. Go forth and multiply.


Music

Matt Carney

Mutemath
8 p.m. Friday
The Conservatory
8911 N. Western
conservatoryokc.com
607-4805

 
Wednesday, October 5, 2011

Skull on the brain

No need to build a Halloween playlist this year.

So you may have heard that The Flaming Lips recently recorded a 24-hour song. Per Wayne Coyne’s promise of a Halloween release date, that song is now available for listening (assuming you are the lucky 999th listener) at flaminglipstwentyfourhoursong.com/. I can tell you right now that the first six or so minutes are pretty wobbling and eerie, and also that I intend to live-blog this thing, titled “7 Skies H3,” all Halloween workday long.

Check back throughout the day as I attempt to at least carve out a third or so of this thing. Feel free to tweet me your thoughts at @okmattcarney, and we can get a little discussion going.

Also, for those of great fortune looking to blow an extra $5,000 on a collector’s item, you can purchase — via PayPal — The Flaming Lips 24-Hour Song Skull™, which is encased in an ACTUAL HUMAN SKULL, thanks to the services of Oklahoma City’s own Skulls Unlimited. Wayne Coyne has assured the public that this is perfectly legal, and also pretty bizarre.

Also, Wayne recently told Pitchfork that the Lips have a laundry list of artists they’re currently either recording with (via email) or talking about recording with that includes Deerhoof, No Age (No Age!), Stars, Death Cab for Cutie, and Nick Cave (Nick Cave!). I think a No Age-Lips EP would absolutely just split my brains out all over the floor.

Anyhoo, live-blogging begins now:

9:40 a.m.: The track begins with a gentle keyboard and short-circuiting guitar ambling around an overhanging haze of synth aura, with little, muted drums plodding along behind.

10:39 a.m.: It was much of the same for the first hour, each instrument growing steadily louder in volume.

11:11 a.m.: Aaaand my Internet connection was interrupted. I am currently listener #1,000. Balls.
by Matt Carney 10.31.2011 2 years ago
at 09:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Rockabye Baby! Lullaby Renditions of The Police / Def Leppard / Van Halen

For the little rocker in all of us. Or at least those of us who one day hope for little rockers of their own.


Eclectic

Matt Carney
I am not a father. Nor do I harbor plans of becoming one anytime soon. I’d like to spawn a kiddo sometime in the next eight or more years, although the technicality of finding a lady nice enough to want to help me out with that is kind of a wild-card factor. Makes such things difficult to predict.
 
Thursday, November 10, 2011

I don't want my MTV


CFN

Gazette staff
This time of year, music geeks across the nation are abuzz over one thing and one thing only: year-end lists.
 
Wednesday, December 14, 2011

VOTD: Local post-Christmas roundup

Holiday hangover edition.

What with last week’s 2011 retrospective, the holiday season and all, I’ve recently lagged behind in posting local music videos. Important lesson learned: It’s dangerous falling back of OKC’s creative folk, as they just continue to pump new stuff out by the hour.


For starters, Delo Creative (the dudes behind Change Yr Life OKC) have a new series they’ve dubbed “Be Nice to Your Kids” (BNTYK, for short), which they christened with a pair of videos of The Boom Bang playing in a dirty men’s room. For whatever reason, it just makes sense. Watch “Vietnomnomnom” and “Sugar Ray Romano” below.





More exciting though are these two energetic vids from post-punk-rockers Chud, who cover themselves in glowing paint while they tear through “Handsome Vampires” and “Control, Alt, Complete.” Something shatters near the end of the latter song. What it is, who knows? Check back soon for a BNTYK session with Gentle Ghost.





Also, I’d be remiss to neglect this nutso Flaming Lips cover of John Lennon’s nutso classic “I Am the Walrus,” also shot by Delo. NYE is coming, folks, and rumors abound of Beatles covers for the visiting Mrs. Ono. Watch Steven Drozd completely lose his mind, below.



If you missed this ridiculous Zane LaRue-shot Chrome Pony video for “Christmas Babes,” his contribution to the Blackwatch Christmas album, then I pity you.



Also, Nathan Poppe snuck into Blackwatch Studios to do this simple, elegant one-shot of Beau Jennings covering Woody Guthrie’s lone Christmas song, assisted by the awesomely-bearded Daniel Foulks. This winsome beauty’s called “1913 Massacre” and it makes “Blue Christmas” sound about as happy as “Super Bass.”

by Matt Carney 12.27.2011 2 years ago
at 09:55 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
 
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