Friday 25 Jul
 
 
 photo BO-Button1_zps13524083.jpg

 

OKG Newsletter


Topic: Japan

Bunraku

Hard to say, hard to love.


Action

Rod Lott
“Bunraku” gets its name from a form of traditional Japanese puppetry, but it may as well be called “Cowboys and Samurai” or something equally generic. The sophomore effort of director Guy Moshe raises hopes for something special in its animated opening credits, which depict violence throughout civilization, but there’s simply too much going on here for a rather simple revenge story.
 
Tuesday, November 1, 2011

The Sylvian Experiments

No further research necessary; they failed.


Horror

Rod Lott
Even masters have their off days. Hiroshi Takahashi, the celebrated screenwriter of Japanese modern horror classics “Don’t Look Up” and “Ringu” (aka “The Ring”), makes a rare outing as director, too, with “Sylvian Experiments,” retitled for American consumption from its original “Kyôfu.” (Gesundheit.)
 
Wednesday, November 2, 2011

OKS Chatter: Boris

Turning Japanese? Do you really think so? Then head over to ACM@UCO tonight for Boris!

Boris — whose repertoire includes everything from heavy metal to pop to art punk — may hail from Tokyo, but its roaring sound is rarely lost in translation. The Japanese trio has been churning out solid tunes for nearly 20 years, at first through their own label (the hilariously named Fangs Anal Satan) and more recently on stoner-metal label Southern Lord.

The band made its first big splash stateside with the release of 2005’s critically acclaimed “Pink” and carried that momentum forward with four studio albums from 2006 to 2008 and an eruption of new material in 2011 that made its way onto three full records: “New Album,” “Heavy Rocks” and “Attention Please.”

Boris has steadily toured the U.S. for well over a decade — including a major gig supporting Nine Inch Nails in 2008 — and it’s right in the midst of its latest run of dates, which included an appearance at Fun Fun Fun Fest in Austin on Sunday.

The band makes a stop tonight at the ACM@UCO Performance Lab, 329 E. Sheridan, the site of the former Green Door. Through an interpreter, drummer Atsuo took the time to talk about being workaholics, mixtapes and Boris’ label as a Japanese heavy-metal act.

OKS: You guys have been playing together for almost 20 years now. How have you evolved and improved the most over that time?

Atsuo: We've just been learning who we are and how big we are in terms of what our capacity is. Who you are and who you think you are. We've learned a lot, but at the end, we just realize who we are.

OKS: You released three studio albums this year. What led you guys to wanting to cram that much new music into a single year rather than spreading it out?

Atsuo: We are just being total workaholics. After tours, we always just want to get back to the studio and start recording. We had a tour before this big American tour, and we've already made 20 songs between them. It's just how we roll.

OKS: What about each of these albums are you most proud of? What do you think you did best on each one?

Atsuo: There was an unreleased album, in our minds, that was meant for 2009. That album led to the two albums — "Attention Please" and "Heavy Rocks" — and "New Album" was a sort of combination of those two. We wanted the audience to hear between the lines or albums or songs the different arrangements. If the audience can enjoy the difference and decide what they like better and ask questions about that to themselves, that was our goal.

Music doesn't have answers. The industry has always been trying to give answers, like we are trying to do this or trying to do that. Listening to bootlegs and mixtapes or different sources of the same song, the definition of the song expands between the takes. Everybody should open their mind to realize that sometimes there is no answer and the searching itself is the fun thing, not knowing the answer. That's what we were trying to express through those albums.

OKS: You are probably best known for your heavier, metal stuff, but you play a lot of different of styles of music. What keeps you from committing to any one genre and what makes you want to explore those different sounds?

Atsuo: To us, the genre, the word itself, it's whatever. We don't care. It's just a word. Every time we come to America, we are described as a Japanese heavy-metal band, and we're like, “We don't care.” It's whatever they want to call us. Putting someone into a genre is the easiest thing you can do.

OKS: How are the crowds in Japan and the U.S. different?

Atuso: We strongly feel that American culture is nothing like what we have in Japan. There are not that much support systems to do touring there, and the venues are just completely different. It's a club where you go listen to the music, but no one hangs out or drinks or socialize in the club at all. That difference is making touring in America much better.

OKS: What sort of plans do you have for the near future in terms of new music?

Atuso: We're confused with how the industry is taking us. These days, people think music is free. Maybe that has to change or there's no more physical records or anything like that. We'll just have to see.



Above photo by Miki Mitsuhima
by Joshua Boydston 11.07.2011 2 years ago
at 12:10 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Redline

On your mark ... get set ... anime!


Action

Rod Lott
Japan anime “Redline” imagines a future where racing isn’t such a big deal in the sports world any more, with the clear exception of the titular race, an anything-goes event held every five years.
 
Friday, January 6, 2012

Film this


OKG7 things to do

Gazette staff
Heads up, anime fans!
 
Wednesday, January 18, 2012

The Shock Labyrinth

Holds as much ‘Shock’ as a 9-volt.


Horror

Rod Lott
If Hollywood ever resurrects its craze of remaking Asian horror films, it's safe to say The Shock Labyrinth won't be high on its list. However, if it were, there's plenty of room for improvement.
 
Friday, May 4, 2012

Mutant Girls Squad

Yes, another story about teen girls with octopus arms.


Action

Rod Lott
If you thought the X-Men series could use schoolgirl uniforms and tools protruding from naughty bits, have the Sushi Typhoon guys got a movie for you! It's called Mutant Girls Squad and, being from Japan, is three times crazier than America would think to make, or have the guts.
 
Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Zoom In: Sex Apartments

A nice place to visit, but you wouldn't want to live there.


Thriller

Rod Lott
It's both a blessing and a shame that Zoom In: Sex Apartments carries such an exploitative title: a blessing because it may trick some horny guys into watching a better movie than they'd expect, and a shame because, well, Sex Apartments. (Hey, it could be worse: The original subtitle was Rape Apartments.)
 
Thursday, July 12, 2012

I Wish

A pair of young brothers need a miracle to reunite a family in a beautifully observant drama.


Drama

Phil Bacharach
I Wish
5:30 and 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m Sunday
Oklahoma City Museum of Art
415 Couch
okcmoa.com
236-3100
$5-$8
 
Wednesday, July 18, 2012

Blade Anime

The vampire hunter gets a toothless treatment.


Action

Rod Lott
I love the character of Blade. I love the Blade comic books, starting with his debut in Marvel's Tomb of Dracula in the 1970s. I love all three Blade movies — yes, including that third one. Hell, I even love the short-lived Blade series Spike TV aired in 2006.
 
Wednesday, August 15, 2012
 
Close
Close
Close