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OKG Newsletter


Topic: twitter

Do you do you do you do you wan-na dance?

With free, new tracks from The Rapture and M83, you oughta be set

While this speculation remains unconfirmed, the New York dance band’s sure to sell a bunch of albums this fall. Their fourth LP, “In the Grace of Your Love,” hits stores in September, courtesy of DFA Records.

The nearly 7-minute melodramatic disco banger “How Deep Is Your Love” is the album’s first single, and if it’s any indicator, “Grace” is going to absolutely slay the competition for album of the year.

Here’s why: The Rapture previously operated as a pretty stripped-down, manic, dance-punk band (see: 2003’s excellent “Echoes”) but “Deep” exhibits some aggressive sonic expansion. Included is a more earnest and theatrical lyrical arrangement as well as more nuanced use of keys and synths, where those were mostly used as solo instruments on previous Rapture records.

Somewhere, Justin Vernon’s beard trembles.

Anywho, M83 is another electro band slated for an ambitious fall release (a double-LP, in fact) that just so happens to have put out a terrific single to hype it.

Midnight City” starts off sounding the way MGMT did on their first record — dancey and psychedelic on an epic scale. I’ve got a feeling that the French electro-poppers will be highly sought-after on next summer’s festival schedule.—Matt Carney


by Matt Carney 07.21.2011 3 years ago
at 01:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Eat your greens

Local restaurants are picking fresh veggies from their own gardens to present hyper-local meals.


Features

Vivian Boroff
Any gardener can tell you that there is a great sense of pride and accomplishment when you can pick something fresh from your garden and use it in your own kitchen. Nothing beats the flavor of produce picked at the stage of perfect ripeness, whether it be an heirloom tomato, or the smallest of berries and herbs.
 
Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Durant talkin’ turkey

@KDTrey5 is at it again.


CFN

Gazette staff

Uh-oh. Looks like this whole NBA lockout thing is for serious, guys.

 
Wednesday, August 17, 2011

The kids are more than all right

Wayne Coyne gets interviewed by adorable children and their Nintendo plushies.

This comes at you courtesy of @indielawyer, better known as Josh Welch, Oklahoma City criminal defense attorney and personal friend of Wayne Coyne. Welch’s kids apparently have an ongoing YouTube series involving their Mario and Luigi dolls, and in this episode, they’re lucky enough to get to interview The Wayne.

What I love about this is how earnest and silly Coyne is with these two boys, and that behavior isn’t even slightly different from any other interview I’ve ever seen him in. Watch for yourself:

by Matt Carney 08.17.2011 2 years ago
at 01:35 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

OKS Chatter: Steven Battles

Chrome Pony’s ringleader needs something totally contrived to be genuine.

Anybody who follows him on Twitter knows Steven Battles to be a funny guy. A recent tweet: “According to research just conducted, I can sing at the top of my lungs on an airplane for 45 seconds before a stewardess asks me to stop.”

Likewise, anybody who’s seen Chrome Pony perform knows that Battles is not only funny, but willing to go so far over-the-top as to suggest that he might think he’s under the lights on Broadway or in a gigantic bowl amphitheater with tens of thousands of star-struck fans egging him on. It’s a sight to behold.

So when the prettiest Pony and I sat down to discuss his most recent project, we wound up talking about a lot of other stuff, too. Like nightmares and his friend Ryan Lindsey, who was kind enough to join us. Read away:

OKS: So what is Chrome Pony, exactly? Because it’s not a set band. And it’s not you, exclusively. It’s something else.

Battles: People don’t understand enough that Chrome Pony is a person. He is his own person. Chrome Pony is not a band. People get that wrong a lot.

OKS: How would you describe it?

Battles: It’s more of an alter ego, but also, he’s his own person.

OKS: You don’t have a lot of say in it?

Battles: No, not really. He actually came to me in a dream. It felt really real.

OKS: Was it more of a nightmare?

Battles: It was kind of a nightmare. It started when I was writing this song called “Chrome Pony,” and then I had a dream about him. I really don’t know that much about him. I just learn a little bit along the way.



OKS: So he’s this alien guy who likes to dress in nice suits and wear sunglasses at night.

Battles: Yeah, the sunglasses is, like, when he’s on.

OKS: Every time I’ve seen you play, there’s been a different lineup. It feels like a circus sometimes when you have so many people onstage.

Battles: That’s a good description.

OKS: How do you keep that many musicians all on the same page? Or do you?

Battles: So much of Chrome Pony is tracked music. That’s the way I shift the show dynamically is by adding or just going through a rotation of musicians. There are people I’ve played with more often, who are core members.

OKS: Do you ever write music with a certain player in mind?

Battles: The only people I’d really written music with are either producers or — the only other person I’ve ever sat down and written stuff with is [Broncho guitarist] Ben King. But he’s a producer as well, he’s produced a lot of stuff I’ve done.

But yeah, I rotate musicians because everyone brings something different. They all write their own parts and things shift dramatically when you change a drummer or add a guitarist. It’s a nice way to counterbalance the repetition and generate some new tracks.

It’s totally a circus. That’s the fun thing. It’s fun to have different friends onstage with you. Some people bring a darker energy, some people bring a lighter energy.


OKS: How many people have played guitar for Chrome Pony?

Lindsey: I played! Me, Jarod [Evans, Blackwatch Studios], Ben, Derek Lemke [Depth & Current], Derek Knowlton [The Pretty Black Chains], Brady [Smith, Gentle Ghost], Brine Webb. Kind of.

Battles: He just grabbed a guitar and got onstage at Norman Music Fest. He’s supposed to play with me some time, legitimately. We didn’t even talk about it. He just jumped up there.

OKS: For a lot of the music that’s made around here and Oklahoma City, I’d say Chrome Pony’s pretty unique. You’ve got some electronica, but that’s mostly DJs. You’ve got Kite Flying Robot in Tulsa, who make electronic rock, but that’s all I can think of off the top of my head.

Battles: I don’t feel like what I do is a whole lot different than what a lot of my friends do. The stuff I write comes from the same place as what they do. I just happened to choose a lot of synths and big beats because it’s cheesy and it’s fun and I like that stuff. I feel like it’s a little cheap and I like it.

One of the more unique things about my music — and it’s not necessarily a positive thing — is that I just go for it. I like to go for a big, pop sound. And like I said, it’s cheap. And I don’t exactly take myself seriously.

I feel like a lot of people around here making music, especially new bands, are kind of afraid to just go for it. You’re in Oklahoma; you have to go for it.

Lindsey: Songs like that are more genuine, anyway.



OKS: The first time I heard “You’ve Got to go Through the Darkness,” I just thought, “What the hecccccck? This is totally different.” It was you making a big song just because you can. That’s the kind of song you wouldn’t have written if you weren’t taking yourself seriously and decided to just go for it.

Battles: I actually wrote that song in high school. But it was completely different. It was the wussiest little song. I did it really fast at first and recorded a different version of it later, in college. I slowed it down and that was, like, a redemption song, so I had to go big.

It was funny, ’cause I was having a hard time [in college], and wound up drunk at a piano and just started belting this song out. I was like, “Yeah, that’s how this song’s supposed to go.” Duh-duh-duh, duh-nuh-nah. That was the redemption part.

OKS: Ryan, you said songs like that are more genuine, anyway. Is it because you’ve got less inhibition about it?

Battles: Yeah, I feel like if you lay yourself out there, there’s something innocent about that.

Lindsey:That’s the art that I see as being genuine. When a person doesn’t let back. It can be subtle. It doesn’t have to be a huge production.

Your first show at Norman Music Fest, the year before, is still my favorite. ’Cause Steven had been working on this project, none of [his close friends] had heard any of it. He was being secretive about it. We were sharing a room, and Steven was just getting quiet about stuff, taking off here and there, going to work with people on stuff. We knew, “OK, he’s got this show, he’s playing after us, so maybe we’ll find out.” And sure enough, Steven shows up in this suit and trench coat, er, a black duster and shades. And it was nighttime and it was hot.


So I figured he’d had something up his sleeves. And then I found out that he’d had something up his sleeves for two months. He was being pretty shifty around the house. It blew my mind. All of us that had been dealing with Steven in that way, we were all surprised. I remember looking at Ben [King] and Chad [Copelin] and smiling so big. And Jarod [Evans]. We all just knew; we didn’t have to say it: “So this is where Steven’s been the last two months.”

Johnny's on Istiklal (Feat. Crystal Vision) by Chrome Pony

OKS: So it sounds like you really need the inauthenticity and the grandiosity of the character to get yourself out there.

Battles: Exactly. That was how I got myself to do it. Since I could hide behind this made-up thing, I could go for it. I’d been nervous, but I’d been in the dungeon working on it with my friends B [Bryan Bryanson] and Katie [Wicks, both with Chrome Pony, Crystal Vision], and that was my hangout for about three months.

Lindsey: It was good for me to see somebody working hard at something, turning down hangouts that I normally wouldn’t turn down to go work on music. That’s just the way Steven does it. When he knows he needs to work, he won’t let his friends distract him. Or keep him up until 6 in the morning so he loses the next day from being worn out. Or the next day because he slept all day. [Laughs]

Battles: I was really nervous because I got that slot. There was a lot of nervous energy. That first show, I hardly moved, I just stood up there at the mic. [Laughs]

OKS: Tell me about this connection with B and Katie. It sounds like that’s what started Chrome Pony.

Battles: My original idea was to start a music project where I didn’t have to have a band. Because I don’t like carrying gear. And the less people in the band, the less you have to split the money. [laughs] I don’t want to carry anything, I make more money, I can get drunk and sing.

I got to know them through Tate James [Delo Creative who directed his video for "Love in a Genocide"]. He hooked us up. I just Facebook-messaged them for a bit. They were running Dance Robots, Dance! at Opolis. I showed up there one night and Katie just attacks me. Gave me a big hug and I realized, “This is gonna work out.” Then I met B and learned he’s the sweetest guy in the world. I went over to their house and showed them some songs I had, and we talked about some stuff I was working on.

OKS: Was it hard showing them those in-progress songs?

Battles: Yeah, it was. I had some songs I’d recorded at Blackwatch, which were “Everything All the Time” and a few others. I didn’t think I’d use those. But those wound up on the album. It got a lot easier as we worked together, because we got to be really close friends.

Everything All the Time (Feat. Crystal Vision) by Chrome Pony

Originally, we were just going to make these songs, and then they were going to spin them, but I eventually decided, “Hey, I kinda wanna play.”

OKS: So you were writing them with the thought that they were just going to be for DJs?

Battles: Yeah.

OKS: So how do you write now?

Battles: I usually start on piano or guitar. Then I start building it in Logic and try to make it as dancey as possible. Also, I do a lot with different producers. I’ve been kinda spoiled by working with them, though. When you start playing shows, it kinda distracts from the writing process.

OKS: Yeah, especially for an act like yours where a lot of planning goes into the performance.

Battles: Yeah, I focused on building the show for a while. Now I’m kind of in writing mode, and I’m shifting that into producing new songs. I’m working on a bunch of different projects right now.

OKS: What else are you working on?

Battles: I’ve been writing a soul/gospel album with Ben King. And I’ve been working on some other, smaller electronic stuff with Costa [Stasinopoulos, of Dead Sea Choir] that’s pretty weird. I’m getting money together to track the soul/gospel record with the Blackwatch guys. And I’m working with a producer named Will Hunt, from Fort Worth, that I’m working on some stuff with. It’ll be more like the darker ’80s hits, pop stuff.

Chrome Pony will play with Lindsey’s band, Broncho, and Stardeath and White Dwarfs on Friday, on the east lawn of the University of Oklahoma. Battles says he’s lining up a Tulsa show in September. Follow him on Twitter because he’s hilarious.

Chrome Pony photos by Nathan Poppe

by Matt Carney 08.25.2011 2 years ago
at 09:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
updated-dustbowl-logo

Weekend math

Shopping + music + food = a fantastic Friday and Saturday

It was only 70 degrees out this morning when I met a friend to go running (or, in my case, stumbling/lurching/whining). 70 degrees! I may or may not have sang a few snippets from “Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah” on the way home, because nothing welcomes a lovely, cool morning like a song from a racist Disney cartoon.

 

So, the weekend. There’s a lot going on — hopefully the nice weather actually sticks around.

Local designer Annah Chakola Ramsey is debuting her new line of jewelry and purses at a trunk show tonight at A Date with Iris. The event is from 5:30-9 p.m. and will also coincide with a fabulous new window display from the Iris ladies (seriously, they create the coolest displays).

The new line was inspired by her travels in Asia, and the gorgeous bags are actually using hand-embroidered fabric she sourced from the Hmong people. If you can’t make it to the show tonight, Annah will also be around from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday.

Tonight is also the kick-off of the Night Food Market, a really fantastic idea that brings together the growing contingent of food trucks in one location for a smorgasbord of late-night eats.

You can find the Night Food Market outside Elemental Coffee (that’s N.W. Eighth and Hudson) from 8 p.m. until 2 a.m. today. Besides food trucks, look for drinks from Coop Ale Works and Elemental.

This is hopefully the start of a new foodie tradition that will set up the last Friday of every month. For more, follow it on Twitter.

Finally, Dustbowl Arts Market presents its fifth semi-annual arts and crafts show Saturday on Campus Corner in Norman.

Besides the regional arts-and-crafters lined up along Buchanan, there will also be a kids’ area and two stages (with 20 local bands set to perform). The market runs from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., and bands will perform from noon to 2 a.m.
by Jenny Coon Peterson 08.26.2011 2 years ago
at 01:50 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

VOTD: Law man

Watch the Choctaw folksinger pick, chat about life on the farm.

Local guy Ryan Lawson has a Twitter handle, but not a TV or access to the Internet. Interesting.

He’s also got a bunch of good, authoritative songs in folk, country and bluegrass styles, so maybe there’s something to living out on the fringe. He also plays his guitar the approximately the same angle Paul McCartney played his bass, which you can watch below, thanks to the “Chevy Bricktown Showcase”:

by Matt Carney 09.02.2011 2 years ago
at 12:40 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Marathon for the prize

Get it? Like 'Race for the Prize'! But longer! Much longer!


CFN

Gazette staff
Prior to famous Flaming Lips front man Wayne Coyne’s entry to the  Twittersphere, one could only speculate what their next song or album would sound like. These days, the energetic singer seems to share every weird moment of his every weird day (and they’re all weird when you’re Wayne Coyne), including the new material he’s recorded with indie acts Neon Indian and Lightning Bolt.
 
Wednesday, September 7, 2011

Mean girl

Insult comic Lisa Lampanelli has built loyal audiences the old-fashioned way: tearing them a new one.


Performing Arts

Rod Lott
Lisa Lampanelli
7 p.m. Friday
Firelake Grand Casino
777 Grand Casino, Shawnee
firelakegrand.com
964-7777
$24
 
Wednesday, September 7, 2011

Now entering Austin City Limits

Check OKSee all weekend for updates from the region’s biggest music festival!

In just a few short hours, I’ll depart my sweet Oklahoma for the very large state of Texas. Specifically, I’m headed to its capital, which is hosting its wonderful, annual Austin City Limits Music Festival. 

Now on my third trip (’08, ’10), I’ve seen some really incredible shows (Glen Hansard and Marketa Irglova in ’08 stand out, as does LCD Soundsystem’s raucous, cathartic show last year) and gotten to interview some really great, talented artists, and this weekend’s shaping up to promise much more of the same!

I’ll be posting interviews with artists and daily recaps here on OKSee all weekend long, regularly updating my Flickr page, and tweeting incessantly, so check in with me to know what’s happening as it’s happening.

Anywho, here’s a list of the artists I’ll be chatting with in the press tent this weekend. Tweet me if you have any questions for them!

• Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr.



• Reptar



• Wax



• Big Boi

Big Boi Ft. Gucci Mane - Shine Blockas Video from SNORTTHIS.COM on Vimeo.



• James Blake

by Matt Carney 09.15.2011 2 years ago
at 02:20 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
 
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