Wednesday 30 Jul
 
 
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OKG Newsletter


Topic: Scoop
Summer-Loveless

To the bitter end

A state senator for District 45 will be crowned today. The seat which occupies parts of southwest Oklahoma City, Moore and Mustang is void of Democrat nominees and therefore a Republican winner take all.

The two GOPers still running are Kyle Loveless and Steve Russell. While Aug. 26 marks the end of their campaigns with the runoff election, it draws to a bitter conclusion. The candidates have been trading jabs at each other since the primary days, which ended July 29.

Russell won the primary with 41 percent of the vote, while Loveless came in second with 27 percent. Short of the 50-percent-plus-one majority margin, a runoff ensued. It didn't take long for fingers to start pointing.

Loveless began criticizing Russell over a State Chamber of Commerce questionnaire when Russell refused to answer two questions about illegal immigration and lawsuit reform. Russell said the questions were poorly written and difficult to answer.

Then Loveless made hay of Russell's recent trip to New Hampshire to help support a Republican Congressional candidate in a primary. Loveless questioned Russell's commitment to the Senate district when, during the heat of the runoff campaign, Russell flew off to New Hampshire to aid another campaign. Russell said he was only there one day.

The issue caused a small dust-up between the two candidates recently at a Panera Bread restaurant when Loveless and Russell accidentally ran into each other.

There have been more entanglements in the final days of the runoff. Russell, retired from the military, enlisted the help of big name Oklahoma Republicans like Mary Fallin and Tom Cole. It's an unusual move for party leaders to engage in internal party elections.

Loveless isn't sitting back and taking it. He mailed out a flyer essentially linking Russell to Democrat Corporation Commissioner Jim Roth by pointing out Russell and Roth have several of the same campaign donors.

Early on runoff morning, the two Senate contenders were out hitting busy intersections, waving to passing motorists in hopes of gaining just a few more votes. Loveless was stationed at the corner of SW 104th and May Ave. with his pregnant wife, Summer, two miles to the west on Santa Fe. Russell positioned himself between the Loveless marriage on Pennsylvania Avenue. Both candidates were more than relieved to be on the final day of the campaign. "Scott Cooper

 

by Scott Cooper 08.27.2008 6 years ago
at 11:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Watch out

Looking for a watch party to attend for election results, and maybe free food? Here are some metro area political parties from which to choose.

 

The OKLAHOMA DEMOCRATIC PARTY

7 p.m.

SKIRVIN PLAZA HOTEL

1 PARK AVENUE

FOOD WILL BE PROVIDED AND THERE WILL BE CASH BARS. PARKING WILL BE PROVIDED AT THE SANTA FE PARKING GARAGE OR VALET PARKING AT THE HOTEL WILL BE AVAILABLE.

 

Oklahoma Republican Party

7-10 p.m.

Oklahoma City Marriott

3233 NW Expressway

Barack Obama and Rep. Mike Shelton watch party. Best Western Broadway Inn, 6101 N. Santa Fe Ave. 7 p.m.

by Scott Cooper 11.05.2008 5 years ago
at 11:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Mary to the rescue

Defending herself from some of the attack ads by her opponent, Dana Murphy has infused Congresswoman Mary Fallin into the race for Corporation Commission.

Murphy found herself on the defensive and now down in the polls after Jim Roth launched a television ad accusing Murphy of ethical deficiency. The ad brings up an alleged forgery complaint from Murphy's divorce 15 years ago.

Murphy has tried to counter Roth's attacks, mentioning to the press Roth's DUI charge more than a decade ago.

Now Murphy is trying to soften the ethical blow with statements from Fallin released this morning.

"Dana Murphy is one of the most ethical people I know," said Fallin. "Dana is a devoted Christian woman deeply committed to her family and to Oklahoma.  We should be proud that someone with her experience, deep love for our state and above all, deep moral commitment to do the right thing every time, wants to serve us as a corporation commissioner.

 "Dana has the experience, the commitment and the determination to serve Oklahoma well. I can't think of a better, more qualified person to be a watchdog for all Oklahomans on the Corporation Commission"

Not sure if that will help make up the 12-point deficit Murphy finds herself in, but throwing the weight around of a popular politician never hurts.

by Scott Cooper 10.30.2008 5 years ago
at 11:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Substance and spark

The first debate between Jim Roth and Dana Murphy for the Corporation Commission had lots of substance and few sparks, until the end that is. Roth the Demo and Murphy the Republican are vying for one of the two Corporation Commission seats up for election this year. Roth was appointed to the position last year when Denise Bode resigned to take a job in Washington D.C. Murphy is a former Corporation Commission attorney and currently has a private law practice dealing in titles and abstracts.

Before last night's debate at OU, I was in the office of debate moderator Keith Gaddie who showed me the questions he was asked to give by the debate sponsors. They were good questions but the most obvious question was missing. I told Gaddie he needs to ask is it ok for Corporation Commission candidates to accept campaign contributions from people and organizations the candidates would regulate over as commissioner. We then headed over to the student union for the debate.

For more than an hour, the candidates displayed excellent knowledge of the issues ranging from electricity rates to wind power. Then Gaddie threw my question out and it was like a drop of nitroglycerine in a can of gasoline. Roth immediately went on the attack. He scolded Murphy for having a large percentage of her donations coming from folks in the oil and gas industry. Murphy at first defended the contributors, saying the bulk were small independent energy producers. Then she shot back at Roth, questioning why his campaign is chaired by four billionaires and why he has received so much money from out-of-state contributions.

It was good stuff.

Some may question why this subject should be in the mix, but it is a very important issue. Candidates have to be judged on their record, ideas and credibility. Accepting donations from individuals or organizations who work in industries the candidates would have control over raises serious ethical questions. It has been suggested in the past that specific races like the corporation commission or the state insurance commissioner should be barred from accepting those types of contributions.

Both Roth and Murphy said they would have no problem with such a rule.

by Scott Cooper 10.10.2008 5 years ago
at 11:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Candidates will spar

Corporation Commission candidates Jim Roth and Dana Murphy have scheduled a public forum on the University of Oklahoma campus Oct. 8.

Roth, the Democrat, currently holds the commission seat up for election in November. He was appointed to the position last year by Gov. Brad Henry.

The Republican Murphy is a successful businesswoman and previously served as an attorney for the commission.

This race has fallen under the radar screen but is expected to be one of the more interesting contests to watch.

Oklahoma Gazette columnist and OU political science professor Keith Gaddie will moderate the forum.

 

by Scott Cooper 09.12.2008 5 years ago
at 11:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Candidates will spar

Corporation Commission candidates Jim Roth and Dana Murphy have scheduled a public forum on the University of Oklahoma campus Oct. 8.

Roth, the Democrat, currently holds the commission seat up for election in November. He was appointed to the position last year by Gov. Brad Henry.

The Republican Murphy is a successful businesswoman and previously served as an attorney for the commission.

This race has fallen under the radar screen but is expected to be one of the more interesting contests to watch.

Oklahoma Gazette columnist and OU political science professor Keith Gaddie will moderate the forum.

 

by Scott Cooper 09.12.2008 5 years ago
at 11:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Short-term retirement

State Sen. Kathleen Wilcoxson announced her retirement from the Senate today and her plans of returning to the classroom as a teacher. Don't expect the retired senator to stay too long in school.

Term limited from making another run for the senate, Wilcoxson has been rumored for a long time as a potential candidate for state superintendent of schools. She was chairwoman of the Senate Education Committee, and made quite vocal her views on education reform. She even blocked one of Gov. Brad Henry's nominations to the state board of education, a former speaker of the House no less, because the nominee did not share her education reform views.

Speculation has current state superintendent Sandy Garrett finally retiring from her long stint as head of the state's education department in 2010, the next time she would be up for re-election. Look for Wilcoxson to make her move at that point.

by Scott Cooper 09.11.2008 5 years ago
at 11:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

New numbers

Some of the first poll numbers for the upcoming election in Oklahoma are out and they do not bode well for Democrats. Of the three top of the ballot races, Republican candidates have the lead in each race.

According to TVPoll.com, Republican John McCain leads Democrat Barack Obama 66 percent to 28 percent in the presidential race. Republican Sen. Jim Inhofe also leads his Democrat opponent state Sen. Andrew Rice 57 percent to 29 percent.

And in what should be the more contested statewide race this year, Republican Dana Murphy has an eight-point lead over Democrat Jim Roth, 44 percent to 36 percent, for the corporation commission.

The poll surveyed 834 likely Oklahoma voters and has a 3.7 percent margin of error.

The numbers may only get worse for Oklahoma Democrats. With the addition of Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin on the GOP presidential ticket, new energy has inspired Republicans across the country to support their party. This could infuse a stronger conservative vote come Nov. 4.

by Scott Cooper 09.10.2008 5 years ago
at 11:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Another interesting choice

The incoming Senate President Pro Tem has made another interesting choice concerning Senate committees. Sen. Glenn Coffee, R-Oklahoma City, has put together his leadership team as pro tem as well as naming the committee chairmanships.

Today he unveiled his picks for vice chairman and the Judiciary Committee choice sticks out. Most would think an attorney would be the logical choice to help run a legal committee. There are plenty in the Senate to choose from like Jonathan Nichols of Norman or Clark Jolley of Edmond. Coffee did select attorney Patrick Anderson of Enid as chairman.

But the judiciary vice chairman spot went to Sen. Susan Paddock of Ada. Not only is the choice interesting because Paddock is a Democrat, which is a nice gesture, but also because Paddock is a teacher by profession. Seems strange to appoint a teacher to a judiciary committee?

Well, Paddock is no ordinary Democrat teacher. During the past few legislative sessions when Republicans were trying their damnest to pass lawsuit reform legislation, Paddock has been the lone Democrat to support her opposing party. Why would she do such a thing? To answer that question, you have to play the connect the dots game.

It starts with the major backers of lawsuit, or tort as some say, reform - the business community and the medical profession. Within those two major backers are sub tort pushers - the state Chamber of Commerce for the business folks and PLICO (Physicians Limited Insurance Company) which is the state's largest insurer of doctors.

Paddock's husband just happens to be a doctor, oh, and a board of director for PLICO.

All dots have now been connected.

by Scott Cooper 12.05.2008 5 years ago
at 11:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Another interesting choice

The incoming Senate President Pro Tem has made another interesting choice concerning Senate committees. Sen. Glenn Coffee, R-Oklahoma City, has put together his leadership team as pro tem as well as naming the committee chairmanships.

Today he unveiled his picks for vice chairman and the Judiciary Committee choice sticks out. Most would think an attorney would be the logical choice to help run a legal committee. There are plenty in the Senate to choose from like Jonathan Nichols of Norman or Clark Jolley of Edmond. Coffee did select attorney Patrick Anderson of Enid as chairman.

But the judiciary vice chairman spot went to Sen. Susan Paddock of Ada. Not only is the choice interesting because Paddock is a Democrat, which is a nice gesture, but also because Paddock is a teacher by profession. Seems strange to appoint a teacher to a judiciary committee?

Well, Paddock is no ordinary Democrat teacher. During the past few legislative sessions when Republicans were trying their damnest to pass lawsuit reform legislation, Paddock has been the lone Democrat to support her opposing party. Why would she do such a thing? To answer that question, you have to play the connect the dots game.

It starts with the major backers of lawsuit, or tort as some say, reform - the business community and the medical profession. Within those two major backers are sub tort pushers - the state Chamber of Commerce for the business folks and PLICO (Physicians Limited Insurance Company) which is the state's largest insurer of doctors.

Paddock's husband just happens to be a doctor, oh, and a board of director for PLICO.

All dots have now been connected.

by Scott Cooper 12.05.2008 5 years ago
at 11:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
 
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