Tuesday 22 Jul
 
 
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OKG Newsletter


Topic: University of Oklahoma

Now you’ve got weekend plans: ‘Soul on Fire’

Before or after you head to Gazette’s Halloween Parade, that is.

At 8 p.m. Saturday, Rose State Performing Arts Center in Midwest City presents the musical “Soul on Fire.”

Oklahoma-based and brimming with Oklahoma talent, this musical boasts a forbidden love, powerful music, punchy dialogue and a heap of secrets that Kisha navigates with the help of Mozes.

Onstage, you might recognize Tyrone Stanley, adjunct professor at Oklahoma City Community College; Donna Cox, music professor at the University of Oklahoma; Bonita Franklin, acting chair for the Department of Music at Langston University; and Bruce Davis, Oklahoma City Police Department veteran, just to name a few.

You'll get a healthy dose of stardom from big-name artists and entertainers like Shirley Murduck and Delvis “Tyga” Graham, as well as Michelle Lynn Hardin, former background singer for John Legend.

What are you waiting for? Secure your soul ... at least for the weekend. Get your tickets at soulonfirethemusical.net. Take advantage of the early bird special through Oct. 31: buy one, get one half off!

by Jenn Scott 10.25.2011 2 years ago
at 12:10 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Heat this


OKG7 things to do

Gazette staff
University of Oklahoma students will craft iron art that even Iron Man would be jealous of, at the Fuego Friday Iron Pour.
 
Wednesday, October 26, 2011

Sterlin’s sterling work

Harjo to be honored with state film award Saturday.

Oklahoma City Museum of Art has a slew of interesting documentaries, both shorts and feature-length, lined up between Thursday and Saturday for its American Indian Cinema Showcase.

If you can attend only one night, why not Saturday, when the Oklahoma Film Critics Circle will honor state filmmaker Sterlin Harjo pictured with an award? Here are the full details in the form of a press release, complete with quotes of things I didn’t really say. (Oh, those PR peeps!) —Rod Lott

Oklahoma Film Critics Circle Honors Sterlin Harjo with Award for Achievement in Film
 
Oklahoma City, Nov. 1, 2011 — The Oklahoma Film Critics Circle has honored filmmaker Sterlin Harjo with the 2011 Tilghman Award celebrating achievement in cinema in the state.
 
The OFF will present Harjo with the Tilghman Award in a short ceremony Friday, Nov. 5, after a screening of his most recent works, a series of documentary shorts for Tulsa’s This Land Press. The screening, which begins at 5:30 p.m., will be at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art as part of the museum’s American Indian Cinema Showcase from Nov. 3 to Nov. 5.
 
Harjo, a 31-year-old member of the Seminole and Creek Nations, has earned international acclaim for films examining contemporary life of Native people. But his feature-length narratives – “Four Sheets to the Wind” in 2007 and “Barking Water” in 2009 – are emotionally rich motion pictures populated by complex characters.
 
“Sterlin’s films are invested with a humanity and depth of emotion that eludes many of his older, more experienced peers,” says OFCC President Rod Lott. “In a short period of time, Sterlin has really raised the bar for Oklahoma filmmakers. He more than deserves the Tilghman for his commitment to his art.”
 
OFCC’s 19 member critics choose as recipients of the award those individuals who have made significant contributions to film, advanced awareness of film in Oklahoma or highlighted Oklahoma as the home of talented and productive filmmakers, actors and others in the industry.
 
Raised in Holdenville and now living in Tulsa, Harjo began his filmmaking career while he was an art student at the University of Oklahoma. He credits a film class of Misha Nedeljkovich there with introducing him to the motion pictures of John Cassavetes and other independent-minded directors.
 
“It really opened my eyes to foreign films and independent films,” Harjo says. “He (Nedeljkovich) introduced me to all these different filmmakers and … the fact that you could make your own kind of film and it didn’t have to be like the stuff you see coming out of Hollywood.”
 
After launching into film, Harjo was selected to the Sundance Institute Filmmaker Lab. There he met producer Chad Burris, a Weatherford native, and the pair collaborated on a short film, “Goodnight Irene,” before tackling a larger project based on Harjo’s screenplay.
 
That resulting work, “Four Sheets to the Wind,” premiered at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival. The film tells the story of a young man named Cufe Smallhill (Cody Lightning) who goes to live with his troubled sister after the death of their father. The movie drew strong critical acclaim and earned a Sundance Special Jury Prize for Tamara Podemski, who portrayed Cufe’s sister. The actress later earned an Independent Spirit Award nomination for her performance.
 
In 2009, Harjo wrote and directed “Barking Water,” a haunting road film about a dying man and his ex-lover traveling across Oklahoma to visit the man’s estranged son. The movie also premiered at Sundance and has been screened around the world.
 
“I just don’t see myself making films about any other place,” Harjo says. “I mainly tell stories about contemporary Native people from specific tribes — usually Seminole and Creek — and the history of those tribes are that they were displaced from their homeland and put in Oklahoma. There’s a whole dynamic there that’s already created; it’s already complex, and it’s already going to influence my storytelling.”
 
Previous Tilghman Award recipients are documentary filmmaker Bradley Beeseley, Oklahoma City Museum of Art film curator Brian Hearn and Circle Cinema Foundation president Clark Wiens.
 
The Tilghman Award is named for William Matthew “Bill” Tilghman, widely credited with being the first individual to make a feature-length movie in what is now Oklahoma. He served as a deputy U.S. marshal and police chief in Oklahoma City, among other law-related positions. Tilghman also served as a state senator. In 1908, he made “A Bank Robbery,” which starred real-life bank robber Al Jennings recreating one of his crimes.
 
It was the first of several films Tilghman set in the state. In 1915, the lawman-turned-filmmaker made “Passing of the Oklahoma Outlaws,” again starring actual criminals and the good guys who chased them. He is known for his attempts to deglamorize the outlaw villain and for striving to prove there are no outlaw heroes.
 
by Rod Lott 11.01.2011 2 years ago
at 01:10 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Jazz this


OKG7 things to do

Gazette staff
A cool night of music at Sooner Theatre, 101 E. Main in Norman, pays tribute to the late Wayman Tisdale, the University of Oklahoma and NBA basketball star turned smooth jazz bass guitarist.
 
Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Out of alignment


CFN

Gazette staff
For the Sept. 28 installment in the wacky world of Big 12 expansion (“Nine is enough”), Chicken-Fried News reported on the University of Oklahoma Board of Regents giving OU President David L. Boren the latitude to negotiate alignment options, prompting a largely anticipated move to the Pacific-12 with Oklahoma State University that ended up, um, not actually happening.
 
Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Art this


OKG7 things to do

Gazette staff
You know the saying “Those who can’t, teach”? The 2011 Faculty Exhibition proves it untrue.
 
Wednesday, November 9, 2011

Baby-item drive takes Bedlam theme

Everybody wins in Infant Crisis Services’ football-themed initiative.


News

Carmen Forman
One Oklahoma City-based nonprofit organization is taking advantage of an age-old bloodlust to raise donations for needy babies.
 
Tuesday, November 15, 2011

VOTD: I could watch this ‘All Day’

Girl Talk’s epic album gets an epic video treatment. Oh, yeah, and he’s playing a secret concert in Norman this weekend.

I once had an extensive discussion with a friend about the mash-up that opens Girl Talk’s fifth album, “All Day,” one of my personal favorites and probably the most fun disc of 2010. The two prominent songs sampled are Ludacris’ “Move Bitch” and Black Sabbath’s “War Pigs,” the former of which my friend Nathan (a gigantic metalhead), said he first listened to in high school while bumping up and down on a tractor on his family’s farm in northwest Oklahoma. If that’s not a funny image, then I don’t know what is.

Whoever’s behind this “Girl Walk // All Day” Kickstarter Campaign (not actually associated with Girl Talk) probably finds similar humor in listening to compulsive dance music in everyday situations. They’ve filmed 12 videos (ostensibly one for each song on the album), which they’ll be premiering each week until mid-January over at The Gothamist.

The first one’s below, and it features a sassy, rogue ballet dancer, a robot-dancing mechanic creep and a bunch of confused onlookers. I just wish I were brave enough to dance like this outside the protective confines of my car.



Also, yes, Girl Talk will be playing somewhere in Norman this weekend, but the location and time of the show have yet to be announced. Axe Body Spray is sponsoring the concert, and tickets will be given out on the University of Oklahoma campus tomorrow. I’ve currently got about a half-dozen surrogates keeping an eye out for me, because I’m not missing this chance to dress up like a goof and unfurl that Girl Talk-loving freak flag of mine.

Also, earnest question: What is an ice cream paint job? Or do I even want to know?
by Matt Carney 12.01.2011 2 years ago
at 09:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

In the ’zona

Headed west, sports fans? Tote this Arizona agenda along for your OU and OSU bowl season touring.


Features

Matt Carney
Pokes and Sooners, riding together! Mass hysteria!
 
Wednesday, December 28, 2011

Bud light

A collection of letters shows the softer side of legendary OU coach Bud Wilkinson.


Nonfiction

Andrew Gilman
Jay Wilkinson
6:30 p.m. Thursday
Full Circle Bookstore
1900 Northwest Expressway
fullcirclebooks.com
842-2900

2 p.m. Saturday
Barnes & Noble
540 Ed Noble Parkway
bn.com
579-8800
 
Wednesday, January 11, 2012
 
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