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OKG Newsletter


Topic: video

VOTD: Me, myself and JT

Timberlake + Fallon = another hilarious hip-hop medley.

From here on out, it’s a pretty safe bet that a Justin Timberlake late-night appearance equates to another installment in the “History of Rap” series, which, as of last night, is now up to three. I think “Part I” will always remain the best just because: 

1. it was completely unexpected,
2. that two white guys slipped from Eminem’s “The Real Slim Shady” straight into Missy Elliot’s “Work It,” each with its little nonsense-isms, and
3. they capped it with the crowd spontaneously singing the chorus to Jay-Z’s love letter to New York.

De La Soul, Sir Mix-a-Lot, Young MC, House of Pain, Coolio, The Fugees, OutKast, Snoop, Kanye, Nicki Minaj and “H.O.R.” mainstays Beastie Boys all get the treatment here. Decide which one you like best:





by Matt Carney 11.01.2011 2 years ago
at 08:20 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Sterlin’s sterling work

Harjo to be honored with state film award Saturday.

Oklahoma City Museum of Art has a slew of interesting documentaries, both shorts and feature-length, lined up between Thursday and Saturday for its American Indian Cinema Showcase.

If you can attend only one night, why not Saturday, when the Oklahoma Film Critics Circle will honor state filmmaker Sterlin Harjo pictured with an award? Here are the full details in the form of a press release, complete with quotes of things I didn’t really say. (Oh, those PR peeps!) —Rod Lott

Oklahoma Film Critics Circle Honors Sterlin Harjo with Award for Achievement in Film
 
Oklahoma City, Nov. 1, 2011 — The Oklahoma Film Critics Circle has honored filmmaker Sterlin Harjo with the 2011 Tilghman Award celebrating achievement in cinema in the state.
 
The OFF will present Harjo with the Tilghman Award in a short ceremony Friday, Nov. 5, after a screening of his most recent works, a series of documentary shorts for Tulsa’s This Land Press. The screening, which begins at 5:30 p.m., will be at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art as part of the museum’s American Indian Cinema Showcase from Nov. 3 to Nov. 5.
 
Harjo, a 31-year-old member of the Seminole and Creek Nations, has earned international acclaim for films examining contemporary life of Native people. But his feature-length narratives – “Four Sheets to the Wind” in 2007 and “Barking Water” in 2009 – are emotionally rich motion pictures populated by complex characters.
 
“Sterlin’s films are invested with a humanity and depth of emotion that eludes many of his older, more experienced peers,” says OFCC President Rod Lott. “In a short period of time, Sterlin has really raised the bar for Oklahoma filmmakers. He more than deserves the Tilghman for his commitment to his art.”
 
OFCC’s 19 member critics choose as recipients of the award those individuals who have made significant contributions to film, advanced awareness of film in Oklahoma or highlighted Oklahoma as the home of talented and productive filmmakers, actors and others in the industry.
 
Raised in Holdenville and now living in Tulsa, Harjo began his filmmaking career while he was an art student at the University of Oklahoma. He credits a film class of Misha Nedeljkovich there with introducing him to the motion pictures of John Cassavetes and other independent-minded directors.
 
“It really opened my eyes to foreign films and independent films,” Harjo says. “He (Nedeljkovich) introduced me to all these different filmmakers and … the fact that you could make your own kind of film and it didn’t have to be like the stuff you see coming out of Hollywood.”
 
After launching into film, Harjo was selected to the Sundance Institute Filmmaker Lab. There he met producer Chad Burris, a Weatherford native, and the pair collaborated on a short film, “Goodnight Irene,” before tackling a larger project based on Harjo’s screenplay.
 
That resulting work, “Four Sheets to the Wind,” premiered at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival. The film tells the story of a young man named Cufe Smallhill (Cody Lightning) who goes to live with his troubled sister after the death of their father. The movie drew strong critical acclaim and earned a Sundance Special Jury Prize for Tamara Podemski, who portrayed Cufe’s sister. The actress later earned an Independent Spirit Award nomination for her performance.
 
In 2009, Harjo wrote and directed “Barking Water,” a haunting road film about a dying man and his ex-lover traveling across Oklahoma to visit the man’s estranged son. The movie also premiered at Sundance and has been screened around the world.
 
“I just don’t see myself making films about any other place,” Harjo says. “I mainly tell stories about contemporary Native people from specific tribes — usually Seminole and Creek — and the history of those tribes are that they were displaced from their homeland and put in Oklahoma. There’s a whole dynamic there that’s already created; it’s already complex, and it’s already going to influence my storytelling.”
 
Previous Tilghman Award recipients are documentary filmmaker Bradley Beeseley, Oklahoma City Museum of Art film curator Brian Hearn and Circle Cinema Foundation president Clark Wiens.
 
The Tilghman Award is named for William Matthew “Bill” Tilghman, widely credited with being the first individual to make a feature-length movie in what is now Oklahoma. He served as a deputy U.S. marshal and police chief in Oklahoma City, among other law-related positions. Tilghman also served as a state senator. In 1908, he made “A Bank Robbery,” which starred real-life bank robber Al Jennings recreating one of his crimes.
 
It was the first of several films Tilghman set in the state. In 1915, the lawman-turned-filmmaker made “Passing of the Oklahoma Outlaws,” again starring actual criminals and the good guys who chased them. He is known for his attempts to deglamorize the outlaw villain and for striving to prove there are no outlaw heroes.
 
by Rod Lott 11.01.2011 2 years ago
at 01:10 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

VOTD: Ida-who?

Watch meek-voiced Idahoan Trevor Powers (aka Youth Lagoon) give a powerful in-studio performance.

Pitchfork’s often criticized for its enormous sway on consumers, which — from time to time, whether intentionally or without intention — it wields to blow bands up (see: Broken Social Scene) or completely and viciously implode them.

Having nabbed Pitchfork’s “Best New Music” accolade on its recent debut, “The Year of Hibernation,”
barely legal Youth Lagoon most definitely qualifies as the latter, and deservedly so. Watch this beautifully lit video for the song “July,” where Powers draws you in with his airy mumbles and plinky piano playing before ratcheting up the drama into a kick-drum-powered funeral march.

I’ve been listening to this guy’s album for a few weeks now and can verify that several songs on it go from frail to triumphant in mere, wonderful moments. “Posters” and “Afternoon” both get capped by welcome dance beats, the production all fuzzed out and swirling around them. It’s a great record about growing up, and I’m excited to say I’ll be seeing him in Denton, Texas, next week. Watch “July” over at Pitchfork.


by Matt Carney 11.04.2011 2 years ago
at 01:25 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Sweet suites

Warren introduces ‘a new way to watch movies.’

As if the balconies at our local Warren Theatre weren’t nifty enough, the Moore multiplex is introducing “a new way to watch movies”: the upper-level Director’s Suites, starting Friday, Nov. 17.

The two suites combine luxury and technology with “the intimacy of a director’s screening room,” according to a press release. Said Bill Warren, Warren Theatres president, in said release, “If you were a movie mogul, this is where you’d watch a movie.”

Here’s what makes the Director’s Suites special:
• a shared private lounge;
• heated seats that fully recline; and
• full food and beverage service.

Ticket prices are $22 for all shows, and, just like a bar, no one under 21 will be admitted. Period. Maybe that’ll eliminate the annoyances of crying children and texting teens. A man can dream! —Rod Lott

Read more about the Director's Suites at OKCBiz.
by Rod Lott 11.07.2011 2 years ago
at 03:20 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

VOTD: French cinema

Watch shirtless, sweaty rockers WU LYF bring the noise two times inside an underground club in Paris.

One of the Internet’s consistently best things is La Blogothéque’s Concerts à emporter, or Takeaway Shows if you’re an unsophisticated American. Video producer Vincent Moon regularly captures the finest storytelling details of the planet’s best bands, whether performing in actual concert (as WU LYF does, below) or in some out-of-context staging that spontaneously spotlights the band’s strongest music sensibility (see Local Natives’ soaring vocal harmonies in a spacious shopping mall, for instance).

In WU LYF’s case, the sepia tones here really match that lush organ that haunts every one of their songs, hanging over the aggressive, soaring sonic mess they create with each performance. Also, it’s just nice to actually have some video of their performance; proof that they’re actually a real thing. Their relative anonymity is one of the reasons I liked the mysterious Englishmen’s debut album so much, and these two tracks, “Summas Bliss” and “Heavy Pop” just made me really sad that they’re busy bouncing between Europe and the American coasts.

Also, massive respect for the Clarence Clemons shoutout in between songs. May the Big Man rest in peace.



Also, turns out the band just put out a video for the song “We Bros.” It’s below.

by Matt Carney 11.15.2011 2 years ago
at 11:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

VOTD: Vincent can go

Tulsa-born pinup St. Vincent plays six songs, expresses love for Robert Fripp and Dimebag Darrell.

In case you missed it, Tulsa-born Annie Clark recorded one of the year’s best albums in “Strange Mercy,” a rich, artful record that’s spiked with moments of morbidity and unexpected sonic textures, mostly supplied by her unique approach to guitar playing.

That style is on clear and wonderful display in these videos from a recent show shot by MTV Hive. Be sure to check out the Frippy, trippy guitar solo on ... well, all most of these songs, but especially “Northern Lights,” which races its way to a climactic finish. Early album standout “Your Lips Are Red” gets a seriously badass, almost metal-heavy facelift here. Also, Annie earns super bonus points for the end-of-show, noisy, crowd-surf move. What I would give to be that lucky stagehand...

Yeah, so come play a hometown show please, Annie. Also, tweet @OKmattcarney if you’d be interested in dating interviewing a fellow Tulsan who loves your music. OK, you got me. I really did mean “dating.” I promise Taylor and I are through.

by Matt Carney 11.21.2011 2 years ago
at 08:50 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

VOTD: It ain’t easy being ... from New Zealand

Bret McKenzie and Kermit the Frog sing an original song from ‘The Muppets.’

There is a poster promoting “Flight of the Conchords”’ second season on HBO in my office. Thus, any video of Bret McKenzie playing or writing songs on the fly are an automatic VOTD, doubly so when accompanied by any Muppet.

That’s the case here, thanks to The New York Times magazine, which corralled the New Zealand comedian into a studio to talk about his work composing original songs for the new “Muppets” movie and even perform one with the little green guy. It’s a fun little feature, and most definitely worth your time (click through to watch). Turns out writing songs for Muppets is extra-tricky, as McKenzie learned.

Also be sure to read Rod Lott’s super-exclusive interview with Jason Segel. And pick up a copy of tomorrow’s Gazette for a review of the film, which also opens tomorrow.

by Matt Carney 11.22.2011 2 years ago
at 08:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Play ball! Again!

Presenting the R&R DVD Gift Guide, Part 1.

Now that holiday season is into full swing, I’m going to start pimping some DVD releases that should not be overlooked for gift possibilities. While not for everyone, certainly there’s somebody on your list who might appreciate such a disc.

We start with the “Official 2011 World Series Film,” which hit stores yesterday. I don’t follow sports, but friends who do tell me this year’s World Series was a big deal, especially if you were rooting for the St. Louis Cardinals. From what I understand, they had one helluva season, and one that began in a less-than-favorable way. But turnaround after turnaround resulted in — spoiler alert! — the team beating the Texas Rangers and walking off with its 11th series championship, a franchise record.

“Official 2011 World Series Film” relives that championship season in a documentary format that features highlights, interviews and behind-the-scenes footage, all narrated by “Mad Men” star Jon Hamm, whose mere voice turns women to Silly Putty.

The double-disc DVD is available now ($29.95); a single-disc Blu-ray ($34.95) follows on Dec. 6. —Rod Lott

by Rod Lott 11.23.2011 2 years ago
at 10:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

VOTD: I could watch this ‘All Day’

Girl Talk’s epic album gets an epic video treatment. Oh, yeah, and he’s playing a secret concert in Norman this weekend.

I once had an extensive discussion with a friend about the mash-up that opens Girl Talk’s fifth album, “All Day,” one of my personal favorites and probably the most fun disc of 2010. The two prominent songs sampled are Ludacris’ “Move Bitch” and Black Sabbath’s “War Pigs,” the former of which my friend Nathan (a gigantic metalhead), said he first listened to in high school while bumping up and down on a tractor on his family’s farm in northwest Oklahoma. If that’s not a funny image, then I don’t know what is.

Whoever’s behind this “Girl Walk // All Day” Kickstarter Campaign (not actually associated with Girl Talk) probably finds similar humor in listening to compulsive dance music in everyday situations. They’ve filmed 12 videos (ostensibly one for each song on the album), which they’ll be premiering each week until mid-January over at The Gothamist.

The first one’s below, and it features a sassy, rogue ballet dancer, a robot-dancing mechanic creep and a bunch of confused onlookers. I just wish I were brave enough to dance like this outside the protective confines of my car.



Also, yes, Girl Talk will be playing somewhere in Norman this weekend, but the location and time of the show have yet to be announced. Axe Body Spray is sponsoring the concert, and tickets will be given out on the University of Oklahoma campus tomorrow. I’ve currently got about a half-dozen surrogates keeping an eye out for me, because I’m not missing this chance to dress up like a goof and unfurl that Girl Talk-loving freak flag of mine.

Also, earnest question: What is an ice cream paint job? Or do I even want to know?
by Matt Carney 12.01.2011 2 years ago
at 09:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

VOTD: That’s not Santa ...

Breakout band Sleigh Bells announces a new album, ‘Reign of Terror.’

The saddest I’ve been in recent memory was when I had to forfeit my tickets to the off-the-rails rave that Brooklyn noise-pop duo Sleigh Bells hosted at my favorite concert venue in the world, Cain’s Ballroom. I love sweaty shows. I love aggressive, loud pop music. But I had to work, which resulted in Matt being a sad panda for about a month.

This was shortly before I got hired by the good people here at the Gazette, who now help to get me into shows like this (thanks, guys!). I mean, seriously, look how awesome this was, courtesy of expert Tulsa photographer Jeremy Charles:


Today the band announced “Reign of Terror,” the follow-up to its 2010 debut, “Treats,” by way of a video that captures the disturbing, harsh intensity of Derek Miller’s guitar riffage against Alexis Krauss’ chic femininity, dressed up in a military uniform like a Bond villainess who only speaks grunts of Russian. I really hope they somehow wield this thing into an insane dance-pop-metal hybrid.

by Matt Carney 12.02.2011 2 years ago
at 10:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
 
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