Saturday 19 Apr
 
 
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OKG Newsletter


Topic: local

VOTD: You’ve got a little something on your, ah, everywhere …

Gentle Ghost: back and bloodier than ever!

Gentle Ghost’s continuing collaboration with Delo Creative on the “Be Nice to Your Kids” video series has yielded not one, but two (!) visual accompaniments for new songs. Check out “Dark Parts,” a nuanced, five-minute track that changes pace a couple different times and has a cool “cut out the heart” lyric, apropos for all the dried blood that’s all over the place.


This one doesn’t include a keyboard and is a little less urgent than “Spearherder,” which we first heard last week, but the songwriting has a bit stronger, more present narrative to it, I think. Watch:

by Matt Carney 01.10.2012 2 years ago
at 10:10 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Odds and ends

New local tunes, info on that Polyphonic Spree show, and a free Flaming Lips documentary.

OKSee got sick last week — the doctor said it was a sinus infection, although I was hoping for “Cat Scratch Fever”— and in so doing, fell woefully behind the times. So here I am catching back up with Oklahoma music-centric news and notes from the last week. Let’s get to it.

First up, we’ve got a couple of hip-hop mixtapes — both from Tulsa rappers, sure enough — that you can cop for free on these here Internets. First is P.D.A.’s “Occupy Hollywood” ...



 ... and next is aDDLib’s “99% of My Fans Wear High Heels.”



Secondly, Other Lives, now a major thing outside our humble borders, are playing shows in Oklahoma City and Tulsa before month’s end. The Stillwater indie band graces the Blue Note on the 27th, so be sure to snag your tickets ($12) as far in advance as possible. As in, right now.

Coincidentally, they also recently announced a headlining date at the Bowery Ballroom in New York City and Coachella Music Festival in Indio, Calif. Awesomesauce.

Thirdly, it appears that Pitchfork has inaugurated a new video series titled “Classic,” with a documentary  about our own balloon-busting, psychedelic-rocking, jelly-not-using Flaming Lips. Specifically, it’s about their 1999 opus, “The Soft Bulletin,” and I can personally say it’s pretty compelling stuff, especially if you still think that “The Spiderbite Song” isn’t about mainlining heroin. Watch the 45-minute doc over at Pitchfork.

Fourthly, The Polyphonic Spree is returning to Norman! The last time the group was here, it headlined the inaugural Norman Music Festival on an adequately sized stage. This time, at 8 p.m. Feb. 7, the Tim DeLaughter-led band’s 20-plus members intend to pack Opolis. I think at this point, if Girl Talk can play a show there, anybody can.

Here are a few details:
• New Fumes are opening.
• Only 150 tickets are available.
• The first set of tickets goes on sale tomorrow at all three Guestroom Records locations.
• Tickets are $25 each, cash only.
• Fifteen pairs of tickets will be given away from The Spy FM Spywagon at various locations throughout the OKC/Norman area on Friday, Jan. 13. Follow @fowlervw on Twitter to find out when and where.

Fifthyly, but surely not leastly, Samantha Crain has a brand-new 7-inch single out. It’s produced by Mr. John Vanderslice and is positively lovely. Snag “A Simple Jungle” and “The Dam Song” at her website.

Other Lives photo by James Rhodes
by Matt Carney 01.10.2012 2 years ago
at 02:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Lemma — Lemma


Rock

Matt Carney
Lemma’s self-titled full-length crackles to life with a big ol’ baritone and spaghetti-Western guitar — a brief harbinger of a rock album that draws its influence from a wide range of artists, R.E.M. chief among them.
 
Wednesday, November 2, 2011

MPFree

Free music for you from The Rapture, Laura Gibson and a bunch of artists in ol’ Norman-town.

Economy — “Winter Recording Fiasco”
I have no idea what Economy is, nor anything more about the “Winter Recording Fiasco” than what the musical collective posted to its Bandcamp page, but judging by that information, it’s the Zanzibar! Records folks exploring their weirdness.

These songs are droning and creepy, pulsing with what sounds like bass keyboard and rhythmic lyrics like “keep the species alive.” They’re also topical enough to title a song after a certain dictator of North Korea, recently deceased.



The Rapture — “Sail Away” remixes
While The Rapture’s full-length fell a little more flat than I’d hoped, it had a couple of standout singles, and “Sail Away” was one of them. Cut Copy gives a signature tribal contribution, Aeroplane’s starts out sparse before blowing up into a full-on house rave, and Cosmic Kids win the award for choppiest chop-up. Their spacier, hypnotic take, complete with long-echoing, mixed-up vocals is about as different from the original as you can get. Thanks, DFA Records!



Laura Gibson — “La Grande”
Plaintive, pretty singer/songwriter Laura Gibson visits Opolis in February with Breathe Owl Breathe. Take this opportunity from NPR to get to know her.

Josh Sallee — “Ride Out”



What immediately grabbed me about this song was the cheesy, Grandma-giving-the-thumbs-up art, which initially triggered what I call a “whack-novelty” reaction deep within my brain. Then the track kicked in and I got all excited for his forthcoming album, “Probably Flaws.” Dude’s got skill, and it’s fun listening to him dance around the melody on the “Birthday Sex” sample. As solid a local hip-hop track as I've heard in a while.

by Matt Carney 01.16.2012 2 years ago
at 08:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

The Flaming Lips to collaborate with Ke$ha

‘The Blah Blah Blah Song,’ anybody?

Last week, Flaming Lips front man Wayne Coyne revealed that the band was putting the finishing touches on its latest project, a collaborative album bundling together work with artists including the likes of Bon Iver, Nick Cave, Edward Sharpe, Yoko Ono and more to be released on Record Store Day. He further stated that the band was hoping to team up with still more artists like Lykke Li, Erykah Badu and … Ke$ha.

It looks like one of those names is about to be checked off the list.

Mack Hawkins — sound engineer and drummer for The Non — revealed on Facebook Monday night that he is headed to Nashville, Tenn., this weekend to engineer and co-produce a track with The Flaming Lips and slut-pop quasi-rapper Ke$ha.

“We knew that she was a fan,” Coyne told Rolling Stone. “There are a lot of these sort of druggy outlets out there that people get connected through. She’s a freak.”

Coyne also said he hopes to do some sort of “weird rap” for the track.

Singer/rapper/glitter enthusiast Ke$ha rose to fame in 2010 on the heels of chart-toppers “Tik Tok,” “Blah Blah Blah” and “We R Who We R.” She is currently working on her second full-length album, set for release in early summer.

Photo by Matt Carney
by Joshua Boydston 01.17.2012 2 years ago
at 09:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

OKS Chatter: Matt Moran

The singer for new Altus band The Typist chats about keeping up with music culture in southwest Oklahoma.

It’s tough work doing everything yourself.

Living in Altus, the post-pop-punkers known as The Typist do a lot of music-related things themselves (read on for more about that), and that includes purchasing and operating their own recording equipment. Turns out, they did that quite well.

There’s a lot of enthusiasm in “Midwestern High Life”’s 10 tracks — specifically, the big-rock keyboard melodies, but also in the earnest, aggressively sung and shouted lyrics that mourn busted-up relationships and reconcile the future against the prospect of leaving where you grew up and fell in love (see: “Midwest”).

Singer Matt Moran was nice enough to answer a few questions about the birth of his band and what it’s like recording music in a place like Altus. Read on, and be sure to give “Midwestern High Life” a listen, below.

The Typist plays The Conservatory tomorrow night with Frank Smith and O Fidelis.

OKS: How did you guys set up this show with Frank Smith and O Fidelis?

Matt Moran: We’ve got a little bit of a history playing The Conservatory with old bands. I was also in a band that played with O Fidelis at the benefit for the UCO Jazz Lab a little while back. That’s how we got that going.

OKS: What other bands have you guys played in?

Moran: Our bassist, Patrick [Bellamy], and I were in You’d Prefer an Astronaut, which was a post-rock band that was in the vein of This Will Destroy You-type music. I’ve been in a few older punk bands from a waaaaay that played Conservatory. It was a pretty youth-punk-type deal.

How did The Typist come to be?

Moran: I’d been in and out of bands, and I started doing stuff on my own. I’d been doing it for a while and I decided, "Y’know, I should probably start recording and playing new songs for people." So I recorded a short little EP — five songs, acoustic — but I realized that I was just meant to do the band thing. I got help from my friends Justin [Strickland, drummer] and Patrick, we started playing the songs and then decided we needed to write songs as a band, and get everybody involved. We came up with an album’s worth of material, so we decided to record it.

We were like, “Well, we can go to a studio and lay this down,” but we decided that we wanted to take the time we wanted to take and not be limited by studio money. So we threw all our money together, bought some recording gear and spent the last two and a half months recording it, day in and day out.

We didn’t even actually add our keyboard player — who’s my brother, Daniel [Moran] — until last month. He came in and laid down a lot of keyboard parts, and as soon as he was finished, we just looked at him and said, “You’ve got no option; you have to be in this band. You just completed it. You made everything sound twice as good.”

OKS: What did Daniel bring with his keyboard? Was he playing a lot of riff-type stuff, or what?

Moran: He was doing a lot of Hammond organ stuff. I happen to be a religious follower of Charles Gillingham of the Counting Crows, and my brother came in and did that type of thing. He nailed it.

OKS: Do you guys all live in Altus?

Moran: Yes, except for Daniel. He lives an hour north, in Elk City.

OKS: What are some of the challenges of living and recording down in the southwest?

Moran: I guess the biggest challenge is just playing as much as you can. Down here — most people don’t know this — we actually have a pretty good music scene. It has a very DIY aesthetic about it. Everything we do, living in Altus, we have to do everything ourselves. If we want to get a show together, it’s the old DIY thing of finding a place, renting it out, getting a sound system, getting everything together yourself, promoting it as much as you can, and trying to do all that.

We like to come up and play in the city as much as we can, because we feel like it’s one of the really good places to be. For so many reasons, we remain here, but we try to make the best of what we got. I think it instills a good work ethic into us.

OKS: What sorts of venues do you guys play in for shows in Altus?

Moran: We’ve done all sorts of shit. We usually rent empty halls out and put it on, but we’ve done house shows. I’ve done a show in a storage shed, which was actually a pretty fun time. We packed about 50 people into it.

OKS: That’s impressive. Do you guys have something like a record store down there?

Moran: We don’t have a record store, but we have a really awesome music store that’s actually helped us out a bunch. Our drummer works there, and they’ve really helped us out and backed us up.

OKS: How do you stay up with new music?

Moran: Largely the Internet. We’ve got friends who are way more into that than we are. I go to Size Records every time I’m in the city, but otherwise, we’ve got to keep up with it online.

OKS: Through the Internet, you’ve got just as much access as me at my desk or somebody in New York or whatever. Do you feel it’s a big enabler for you guys, like you have the same opportunity as anybody else?

Moran: Yes, definitely. That hits the nail on the head. It’s kind of an equalizer for us. It’s not like we can go up and socialize with people as much as we want to, or go to the places we want to go on a regular basis. We have to socialize and keep up with music online, then make the trip when we can. 

OKS: What are the biggest limitations in being physically removed from the music scene in OKC, where you’d like to be more involved?

Moran: Mainly, it puts a limit on the camaraderie you can have. It’s a small social network that we have, and you don’t get to connect with people as much as you like to. When you can’t have that regular connection, it makes it difficult.

OKS: How does that frustration factor into you guys’ music?

Moran: Because of the tighter circle, we all know each other — musically — really well. You’ve got limited resources and limited people to make things happen with, so you really get to know each other. You grow to be a family.

Our drummer, he’s an incredible drummer. When he tells me something, I know exactly where he’s coming from, what he’s talking about. There’s nothing that ever gets lost in translation from instrument to instrument, player to player, or whatever.

OKS: If you had to sit down and talk it out as a band, what band would you say informed your music directly?

Moran: Like our biggest influence? I’d have to say probably a band like Manchester Orchestra. Very direct rock ’n’ roll with Southern sound and a distinct keyboard.

OKS: Who wrote the lyrics? You?

Moran: Yeah, that was me. It was an interesting feeling to write all the lyrics for a record.

OKS: Had you never done that before?

Moran: I had, just mostly for my personal music before. Never with a band.

OKS: So were you apprehensive going into it?

Moran: It honestly did, because these other guys are really great musicians. I didn’t want to do them a disservice. I didn’t want them to walk away thinking, “This should change, that should change.”

OKS: Did anybody else in the band try to offer advice on the lyric-writing, or do they understand it to be your thing?

Moran: They leave it to me, but they’re very free with the advice on the vocal melodies.

Listen to The Typist’s first album, “Midwestern High Life,” below. You can download it for $5.


by Matt Carney 01.20.2012 2 years ago
at 09:10 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Austin-bound

Which Oklahoma bands made the cut for this year’s SXSW festival?

Congratulations are in order for a handful of local bands named to the official South by Southwest festival schedule this week! They are:

Jacob Abello
The Boom Bang
Defining Times
Junebug Spade
The Non (guitarist Zach Zeller pictured)
Horse Thief

Looking forward to seeing and hearing you guys represent the north side of the Red River well! Feel free to check out the rest of the bands listed at the SXSW site.

Former OKSee skipper Stephen Carradini and I will in Austin, Texas, next month (next month, you guys!), possibly with regular Gazette contributor Joshua Boydston, whose press credentials we’re waiting to receive. We’ll be crawling all over town to bring you recaps and photos from these and other bands’ sets, so be sure to check back with OKSee and follow us on Twitter, too.
by Matt Carney 02.01.2012 2 years ago
at 01:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

MPFree

Lots of locals in this week’s edition of cost-nothing listening, including Two Suns, Dr. Pants and O Fidelis.

O Fidelis — “Mad World”
Normally, married Okie folkers’ songs occupy the opposite side of the emotional spectrum as this 1982 Tears for Fears track (which you might recall that Gary Jules covered for the cult film “Donnie Darko”), but this cover suits them quite nicely, I think.



Dr. Pants — “Calling Chewbacca”

Don’t neglect to read the story behind this one. It’s a doozy.


Two Suns — “Not the End” and “Nostalgic”
“Dream Familiar,” the debut LP from Jake Davidson’s Norman recording project Two Suns, is now up to five tracks available for listening in his ongoing-release model. Check ’em out, as well as our review of the entire record.



Larry Chin — “Days and Nights”
While not a new song, this dreamy, drippy guitar track from Kyle Mayfield (né Larry Chin) is now available for free download, with the message that he’s working on a new EP. Gives a new meaning to the phrase “chin music.” Anyway, this one gives a local lease on the excellent major indie band Real Estate.


Jack White — “Love Interruption”
Let’s just say I liked Jack White better when he sported red and white and distorted blues guitar. This clarinet-blue-shaving-thing just isn’t working out for me.


Dr. Dog — “Be the Void”
OKSee’s groovier, hippie tendencies got really excited last week when we found out Delo Creative shot the video for the first single on this record. With the whole album now available to hear, we’re happier than a dog off his leash.

Shearwater — “Animal Joy”
Looking for a high-concept indie record about nature? Look no further.

Air— “Le Voyage Dans La”
This first track “Astronomic Club” goes from sounding like My Morning Jacket’s weird single “Holding On to Black Metal” into some kind of oddball spaghetti Western twang. Welcome back, Air.

Fucked Up — “Zodiac”
A couple of rare tracks from Canadian hardcore sextet about the Chinese zodiac. Nifty.

by Matt Carney 02.06.2012 2 years ago
at 03:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Silly love songs

With Valentine’s Day on the immediate horizon, local artists share their go-to tunes for loving tender. Or, y'know, gettin' your freak on.

 
Wednesday, February 8, 2012
 
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