Saturday 26 Jul
 
 
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OKG Newsletter


Topic: rock

VOTD: Don’t call it a comeback.

’Cause it’s not.

The song’s new, but the band sure isn’t. In fact, when R.E.M. called it a day a few weeks ago, it was really just the beginning of the end, and in between those comes the release of “Part Lies, Part Heart, Part Truth, Part Garbage: 1982 - 2011,” a career-spanning, 40-song retrospective.

“We All Go Back to Where We Belong” is one of the album’s three new songs, and it’s so important that it gets two (!) weird, arty, overexposed, but nonetheless charming videos to go along with it. First up is my personally preferred version, which features Mary Jane Watson Kirsten Dunst who does about 98 percent of the acting here with her lips.

Next is acclaimed poet and activist John Giorno, who appears to suffer separate occurrences of minor brain damage throughout the video, which is lit and arranged exactly the same as Dunst’s. Weird. Good thing the song’s as pretty as anything the band’s ever recorded. The line about “tasting the ocean on your skin” really gets me. Watch both below:




by Matt Carney 10.28.2011 2 years ago
at 09:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Skull on the brain

No need to build a Halloween playlist this year.

So you may have heard that The Flaming Lips recently recorded a 24-hour song. Per Wayne Coyne’s promise of a Halloween release date, that song is now available for listening (assuming you are the lucky 999th listener) at flaminglipstwentyfourhoursong.com/. I can tell you right now that the first six or so minutes are pretty wobbling and eerie, and also that I intend to live-blog this thing, titled “7 Skies H3,” all Halloween workday long.

Check back throughout the day as I attempt to at least carve out a third or so of this thing. Feel free to tweet me your thoughts at @okmattcarney, and we can get a little discussion going.

Also, for those of great fortune looking to blow an extra $5,000 on a collector’s item, you can purchase — via PayPal — The Flaming Lips 24-Hour Song Skull™, which is encased in an ACTUAL HUMAN SKULL, thanks to the services of Oklahoma City’s own Skulls Unlimited. Wayne Coyne has assured the public that this is perfectly legal, and also pretty bizarre.

Also, Wayne recently told Pitchfork that the Lips have a laundry list of artists they’re currently either recording with (via email) or talking about recording with that includes Deerhoof, No Age (No Age!), Stars, Death Cab for Cutie, and Nick Cave (Nick Cave!). I think a No Age-Lips EP would absolutely just split my brains out all over the floor.

Anyhoo, live-blogging begins now:

9:40 a.m.: The track begins with a gentle keyboard and short-circuiting guitar ambling around an overhanging haze of synth aura, with little, muted drums plodding along behind.

10:39 a.m.: It was much of the same for the first hour, each instrument growing steadily louder in volume.

11:11 a.m.: Aaaand my Internet connection was interrupted. I am currently listener #1,000. Balls.
by Matt Carney 10.31.2011 2 years ago
at 09:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Doggie style

Scruffy mutts no more, Dr. Dog has groomed its psych-rock sound into a purebred, all thanks to its live show.


Music

Matt Carney
Dr. Dog with The Quiet Life
7 p.m. Monday
Cain's Ballroom
423 N. Main, Tulsa
cainsballroom.com
918-584-2306
$20 advance, $22 door
 
Wednesday, November 2, 2011

The Damn Quails — Down The Hatch


Country

Matt Carney
“Down the Hatch” is an important debut release for more than just the duo of Gabriel Marshall and Bryon White, who go by The Damn Quails. It’s indie label 598 Recordings’ (Chance Sparkman and Mike McClure) first long player, and a product of a prodigious amount of homegrown talent.
 
Wednesday, October 26, 2011

Dope heads

From a shared love of a half-naked man in a bunny mask, two local music fans give birth to Okie Dope Records.


Music

Joshua Boydston
Nobunny with The Boom Bang And The Copperheads
8 p.m. Friday
The Conservatory
8911 N. Western
conservatoryokc.com
607-4805
$10
 
Wednesday, November 2, 2011

VOTD: Girls aplenty

Watch eight beautiful, grainy videos of Girls’ Christopher Owens at an SF gallery.

Stereogum pointed out late Tuesday that a bunch of videos of mushy-gushy bedroom songwriter Christopher Owens of Girls performing songs both released and unheard showed up on the openingceremony.us blog this weekend.

“I wrote this song a coupla days ago, hadn’t played it for anybody yet,” he said before dedicating “Key to My Heart” to his girlfriend. The song (and several others here) didn’t appear on last year’s “Broken Dreams Club” EP, nor on this year’s fantastic “Father, Son, Holy Ghost,” suggesting he’s probably got a wealth of scribbled-in notebooks full of lyrics stashed away somewhere.

The filters on the video (it’s almost exclusively black-and-white, except for “Cold Again,” with splices of sepia color), Owens’ jean jacket and the folkie setup make these performances seem really timeless. Watch for yourself:

“Solitude”


“Mr. Blue”


“Saying I Love You”


“Nobody’s Business”


“Keys to My Heart”


“End of the World”


“Cold Again”


“Back to London”
by Matt Carney 11.03.2011 2 years ago
at 08:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Punk this


OKG7 things to do

Gazette staff
Compared to Rancid and Green Day, up-and-coming punk band JuiceheaD performs Friday at Big Papa’s Pour House, 3034 N. Portland, so you can ask them, “What’s up with that capital D on the end?”
 
Wednesday, November 9, 2011

OKS Chatter: Reptar

Oddball five-piece Reptar rawrs its way into your heart.

At an early day set at this year’s Austin City Limits Music Festival, I caught the Athens, Ga.-based Reptar hosting a big party at one of the smaller stages, plopping synth melodies and jumping around onstage while encouraging the audience — that really didn’t need the prompting — to join them.

I later caught up with synth player Ryan Engleberger and multi-instrumentalist Graham Ulicny to talk about the band’s hometown, extroversion and why its debut EP is named “Oblange Fizz Y’all.”

OKSee: What’s the music scene in Athens like right now?

Engleberger: Athens is really interesting, because there’s this constant tension between people like Graham and I, who are townies who moved there because there’s a lot to offer that isn’t related to the University of Georgia. Then there’s the U of Georgia side that’s Andrew and William. We actually represent a pretty good merger of townies and school kids.

Sometimes people who write for publications take sides and create divisions when there aren’t really any. But we all play with each other. It’s hard not to be influenced by one side, if you’re the other.

OKS: What’s each side specifically known for?

Engleberger: I think the stereotype is that the townies are a little weirder. Then the UGA side is frattier.



OKS: Explain the title of your EP. Because I don’t know how to pronounce or what the hell it means.

Engleberger: The title is actually a combination of a couple of ancient, now-defunct languages. And also English. You can find “fizz” in the Oxford English Dictionary. To fizz. To have fizzed. Having been fizzed.

Graham Ulicny: Desperately want to fizz. To fizz oblangley.

Engleberger: Right. “Oblangle” is a combination of words from ancient languages. There’s a symbol from a Mayan word, a Latin word and not Czech, but a precursor to Czech. There’s a combination of that, the deep linguistic studies we all do. I think mostly, it’s just from the sonic, train-of-thought conversations we have that don’t always make sense, but have to do with us making sounds and reciting things that we maybe have half-learned before. It just kinda came up.

OKS: Did you guys study linguistics in school?

Engleberger: I totally made that up. I studied Latin for a bit, I guess.

OKS: Why do you guys go full steam ahead into synthesizer-driven melodies?

Engleberger: I think the melody-heavy part is because of pop songs. Pop songs are all about melody. We wanted experimental elements, but mostly we want to record songs that people will listen to and enjoy, you know? We want to mess with them and take them out of their comfort zone, but in order for them to get into it, there has to be a good melody. Graham studied jazz, and it’s all about melody. A lot of really complicated stuff spins out of that, but that’s the basis.

Ulicny: It’s about a communal experience. There’s a lot of ways to enjoy music in a crowd, but we’re always looking to encourage people to be extroverted. And the best way to do that is to have something relatable, like a melody. And energy onstage.

OKS: And you guys are nothing if not extroverted, onstage.

Engleberger: We try.



Photo by Matt Carney
by Matt Carney 11.09.2011 2 years ago
at 12:25 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Loose changes

Metro rock’s Theatre Breaks Loose may do that with its new album, which tosses out all those annoying ‘bells and whistles.’


Music

Joshua Boydston
Theatre Breaks Loose with Defining Times, Command The Clouds, Wings Of The Wave and Greater Estates
6 p.m. Saturday
The Conservatory
8911 N. Western
conservatoryokc.com
607-4805
$10 advance, $12 door
 
Wednesday, November 9, 2011
jabee

VOTD: Showcasin’

Watch a couple of locals mix genres and styles on ‘Chevy Bricktown Showcase.’

OKC psychedelic rock band Horse Thief interviews local rapper Jabee in this genre-busting edition of the “Chevy Bricktown Showcase.” Denver Duncan gives the silky-voiced loop assist in this performance. Watch:

by Matt Carney 11.14.2011 2 years ago
at 08:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
 
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