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OKG Newsletter


Topic: Matt Carney

VOTD: Project Nghiem

Stop-motion master Kyle Roberts hooks up with The Nghiems to produce the year's most fun local video.

If you're not familiar with Norman band The Nghiems (pronounced “Nims”) or the terrific things that Reckless Abandonment Pictures' Kyle Roberts is up to, then take five minutes to familiarize yourself.

It's pretty awesome that each member of the band has his or her own signature video-game moves in the video for "Dum Dum Dah Dah" (my favorites are James' on-the-ground forcefield drumroll and just getting to watch Jen kick butt in general), but what's really kind of amazing is the fact that David Nghiem apparently dreams in a video-game format.



Also, watch for Tyler Hopkins and Tanner Blair, who are probably the two most convincing bad guys I never would have considered to be bad guys. And there just can't be enough said about how fun-loving and silly Roberts' stop-motion stuff is. Be sure to check out "Battle of the Bonds," too, if you haven't already.
by Matt Carney 10.03.2011 2 years ago
at 09:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
 

Christmastime in September

Now it's October. But the video was shot in September. And the song's due in December.

I was lucky enough to get to hang out with Okie singer Samantha Crain recently, as she recorded her contribution to this year's Fowler Volkswagen Christmas compilation. You might recall last year's edition — of silly cover — which was recorded by Chris Harris at Hook Echo Sound and even spawned a really great free holiday concert. 

This year's edition currently is being recorded at Blackwatch Studios, and owner/producer Jarod Evans says the album will feature Colourmusic, Sherree Chamberlain, Chrome Pony, Ol' Savior and more, including Ryan Lindsey singing the wonderfully titled "I'm Coming Down Your Chimney." Nathan Poppe's been tapped to shoot a promotional music video for the album, and he subsequently tapped yours truly to help out.

Watching Sam work on her Oklahoma-themed girl-crush seasonal song with Jarod and Daniel Foulks, her friendly fiddle player was a delight. At first, they considered doing a Lucinda Williams number, but decided it'd be more fun to layer a bunch of vocals over a steady, crackling-fire beat with plenty of sleigh bells, like a '60s girl-group song. Of the tracks I've heard, it's my favorite so far. Looking forward to picking up a copy come Christmastime! Watch video of her and Daniel recording their parts. Apologies for me being a bit of a wobbly videographer. Musicians make me nervous:




by Matt Carney 10.03.2011 2 years ago
at 01:50 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Mmm ... Minty!

Norman’s much-loved Starlight Mints announce digital releases, singer’s solo album.

I’ve only enjoyed the pleasure of hearing the Starlight Mints play once, but it was most definitely enough to make the email I received from Allan Vest today a very happy one. 

According to Vest, the band’s two earliest albums, 2000’s “The Dream That Stuff Was Made Of” and  2003’s “Built On Squares” are now available for purchase from  iTunes, Amazon MP3, eMusic, Rhapsody, Napster and other digital music outlets. While OKS is personally very fond of “Rhino Stomp” and “Drowaton” in general, this is good news that the band’s older material’s finally found its way online. Now go buy it!

Vest, of Edmond, also said that he’s currently working on solo material in pursuit of a career in film and television scoring. Go, Oklahoma!













by Matt Carney 10.04.2011 2 years ago
at 12:35 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

That’s like, a quarter of a day, man.

The Flaming Lips’ six-hour song to be released ... soon, we understand.

Warner Bros. Records announced yesterday that The Flaming Lips’ much-publicized, somewhat anticipated and sure-to-be-psychedelic, charitable, six-hour-long song, “Found a Star on the Ground,” will be released very soon. A press release said to stay tuned to the band’s website for information.

Also contained within the release was this odd little nugget:

“The song itself will be contained within a newly-developed mesmerizing toy, THE STROBO TRIP. This unique devise has been called ‘A Light & Audio Phase Illusions Toy’ to use used in conjunction with ‘Found A Star On The Ground’ to create a complete Lipsian happening to be enjoyed by yourself or with other interesting people or pets.”

It adds the following explanation, for context (one supposes):

“Honestly users, you'll just have to experience this multi-sensory phenomenon for yourselves to understand the concept.”

We appreciate your candidness in being incapable of explaining the inner workings of The Flaming Lips’ collective brain to the masses, Warner Bros.
by Matt Carney 10.04.2011 2 years ago
at 01:55 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Math test

After Oklahoma weather failed them, the men of Mutemath make a calculated move to bring their ‘Odd Soul’ to town. Go forth and multiply.


Music

Matt Carney

Mutemath
8 p.m. Friday
The Conservatory
8911 N. Western
conservatoryokc.com
607-4805

 
Wednesday, October 5, 2011

Without Thunder

Life will go on. We promise.


Features

Matt Carney
The forecast for this lockout is Cold War, in more ways than one.
 
Wednesday, October 5, 2011

VOTD: Stephen's grievin'

Watch Stephen Malkmus and co. rock a dirty, scenic NYC rooftop.

Easily one of my favorite songs from the current Stephen Malkmus album was the youthful, fed-up shouter “Tune Grief,” which gets the Pitchfork TV treatment today. There’s something really perfect about the graffiti-blasted rooftop and sunset, which matches Malkmus’s nonsense-spewing and teenaged attitude.

Also, I really want that super-cool Silver Jews hat that he’s rocking. Don’t forget to scroll through for a couple more tracks from this session, including “Forever 28” and “Senators.”

by Matt Carney 10.05.2011 2 years ago
at 10:10 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
sherreechamberlain

Kickstart a local album!

Help Okie singer Sherree Chamberlain record her second disc.

There aren’t a whole lot of local female musicians who are as talented as Sherree Chamberlain. Her debut album, 2009’s “The Wasp in the Room” was as lovely a work as you’ll find around these parts, and it’s most definitely in need of a follow-up. To the Internets!

Chamberlain has started a Kickstarter page in an attempt to raise money to record her sophomore album, which she’s already written, and titled “New Skin.” On the page is a really funny, candid video of her discussing the details of the disc, and what she’ll do if a baby donates money to her cause: “I will hunt down a mother, find some breast milk, and feed it to you in a bottle.”

Watch, then head to the site and pledge some money! She’s already $1,700 toward her goal, which she must achieve by the end of this month.  



Also, I just realized that for a $500 donation, she’d cover any song of my choosing. Never in my life have I been more sure of the fact that I want to hear Sherree Chamberlain record a version of “Int’l Players Anthem (I Choose You).”
by Matt Carney 10.06.2011 2 years ago
at 12:10 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

What’s good, KD?

The first in a series, wherein I evaluate the Durantula’s music evaluations.

With the outlook for a full (or even halved) NBA season growing bleaker and bleaker, I’ve realized how weirdly unhealthy my obsession with Kevin Durant is.

I constantly refresh his Twitter and Facebook pages on the regular, hoping to catch a few loose links to videos of semi-pro games he’s dominating, or news about the movie he’s shooting, or awesome photos of him repping Oklahoma. Heck, I even bought a pair of his shoes, just for playing pickup ball.

In all this, I’ve noticed how much this guy cares about music (exclusively hip-hop and R&B, from what I’ve seen), as he’s constantly talking and arguing about what he’s listening to. Just a few days ago, Durantula defended West Coast mixtaper Dom Kennedy via Twitter, after arguing with @waldorfsfinest (apparently a friend?) between Pusha T and Young Jeezy the night before. He’s also been pushing Big K.R.I.T., an upcoming Southern trunk rapper/producer, extensively the last couple of weeks.

So I thought it might be fun to tune into No. 35’s Skullcandy headphones and analyze what he’s saying about it. Here’s your first installment of “What’s good, KD?”

Let’s consider his recent brief assessment of Clipse member and Kanye collaborator Pusha T. From Durantula’s Facebook, around about 2 a.m. yesterday:

“Now playin on my Skullcandy's: ‘open your eyes’ - Pusha T. MEEEAAANN track!!!”



Clipse’s 2006 street-rap manifesto “Hell Hath No Fury” set a high bar for mean hip-hop, and Pusha’s work since then’s been similarly aggressive. He loves to set your expectations much lower with especially playful beats and samples (the “Bohemian Rhapsody” sample on “Open Your Eyes” is textbook), then skewer them by comparing himself to, say, the genocidal Hutu tribe, as he does on “Fury”’s “Wamp Wamp (What It Do).” It’s one of the reasons he’s been so great with Kanye, who’s been similarly aggressive and graphic lately.

I’d be inclined to agree with KDTrey5 here then, except Pusha doesn’t really hit you that hard lyrically, and certainly not in the same place. On “Open Your Eyes,” he’s more earnest about his drug-dealing past, and proud of his success (“bigger homes, with bigger guns and better cameras”) than he is aggrandizing. It’s less intimidating, especially when you compare the track with his recent “Fear of God” mixtape (from standout song “My God”: “I gotta voodoo doll / Every time I pin the verse / Not only do they say they feel it but they say it hurts”).

This seems to me more like post-game wind-down music than a really gritty, mean, pre-game warmup track. So KD, while I do love that you’re into Pusha T, dig into some of his other work for stuff that’s truly “MEEEAAANN,” and you’ll instill the “fear of God” within the heart of every three-man in the league this season.
by Matt Carney 10.06.2011 2 years ago
at 02:40 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
portishead

VOTD: Trip-hop to the rescue

Watch Portishead play its first American TV show in over a decade.

Just when I was getting worried for a while that the super-aggro, mass-culture-canned version of dubstep (see: Skrillex, Excision) was starting to completely fill out the mainstream’s understanding of electronic music, legendary English innovators Portishead calmed me down. The trip-hop act showed up on “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” to play a brand new song and a classic, for the first time on American TV in 13 years. 

Watch (or rather, experience) “Chase the Tear,” which the band is currently promoting as a 12” release, and “Mysterons,” a haunting song that will probably outlive us all:



by Matt Carney 10.07.2011 2 years ago
at 10:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
 
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