Punk fest Everything Is Not OK returns bigger and bolder to Oklahoma City 

 

click to enlarge Q during Everything is Not OK at The Shop in Oklahoma City, Saturday, March 14, 2015. - PHOTO BY GARETT FISBECK
  • Photo by Garett Fisbeck
  • Q during Everything is Not OK at The Shop in Oklahoma City, Saturday, March 14, 2015.

When putting together Everything Is Not OK, last year’s DIY punk haven in Oklahoma City, organizer Roz Adams was surprised by how large it would ultimately grow. But that festival was small compared to its ambitious, four-day sequel.

A swarm of more than 50 bands, in addition to a number of showcasing visual artists, will descend upon the metro from Thursday, March 10, to Sunday, March 13 for Everything Is Not OK II: How Do You Put A Price On Garbage?

Adams said the definition of garbage is up to interpretation. He came across the idea for the tagline during last year’s event while speaking with friend and artist Cherene Dijital.

“We were discussing how one goes about pricing their own original artwork, and she said, ‘How do you put a price on garbage?’” he said. “We laughed, and I said, ‘If I do this again next year, that’s what I’m going to call it.’ I did it again, so that’s what I called it.”

The fest begins with a 7 p.m. show March 10 at 89th Street Collective, 8911 N. Western Ave. Through Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 13 more shows will take place across six different venues, including 89th Street; Snug Lounge, 2321 S. Robinson Ave.; District House, 1755 NW 16th St.; The Red Cup, 3122 N. Classen Blvd.; and Tree and Leaf Clothing, 1705B NW 16th St.

Philadelphia’s soulful Sheer Mag, Rhode Island’s Downtown Boys, Mystic Inane from New Orleans and Texans Sin Motivo are among the bigger touring bands participating.

Free visual art showcases will also be held throughout the weekend at Tree and Leaf; District House; The Nursery, 1618 NW 16th St.; DNA Galleries, 1709 NW 16th St.; and Dig It! Boutique, 1739 NW 16th St.

Adams originally came up with Everything Is Not OK as a way to give a more visible platform to DIY punk artists who often are not displayed in a way or with a reverence that other types of art are. The DIY (do it yourself) ethic is important to punk culture because it extols the ideas of self-expression and anti-consumerism.

Adams said the event is not just for those in the know or people well-established in the scene.

“Be yourself,” he said. “If you want to see some cool bands and some cool art, come check out this event.”

He also hopes the event shows those from outside the state or community that there’s a lot of special work being done here.

“There is a vast pool of creative individuals making beautiful visual art, making music that hits you so hard, making their own world a better place,” he said. “In turn, [they’re] making life more enjoyable for all of us. I feel lucky to be surrounded by so many outstanding individuals. It feels really good to be a part of something bigger than one person, bigger than one band.”


Ross Adams poses for a photo near the East Oak Landfill in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2016. - GARETT FISBECK
  • Garett Fisbeck
  • Ross Adams poses for a photo near the East Oak Landfill in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2016.

Full Q&A with Everything Is Not OK organizer Roz Adams

OKG: Where does the tagline "How do you put a price on garbage?" come from? How do you define garbage?

RA: Last year, right before the festival, I was talking with my friend Cherene Dijital, who is also an artist participating in the event. We were discussing how one goes about pricing their own original artwork, and she said, “How do you put a price on garbage?” We laughed, and I said, ‘If I do this again next year, that’s what I’m going to call it. I did it again, so that’s what I called it. As for defining garbage, I think that is all about perspective.

OKG: People put a price on garbage every day on Craigslist. Have you ever used it? Do you get nervous interacting with random people from the Internet?

RA: I have seen Craigslist; I wasn’t impressed. I purchased a stereo once from a listing on Craigslist. Ten out of 10 experience. I don’t often interact with random people from the Internet; I hear that can be dangerous.

OKG: If you had to pick out a band or person in the fest and say, “Wow. This is a role model,” who would that be?

RA: I don’t think I could pick out a single person or band to label as such. I think that everyone involved, from artists and performers to observers and people working behind the scenes, they are all great people. That’s the thing about this event; I attribute its success to every person that experienced it; every person that got to feel comfortable being themselves, even if just for a fleeting moment; every single person that wanted to make the experience. No heroes.

OKG: Do I need to be punk to fit in at this festival?

RA: If that’s what you want to get out if it, sure? I have no idea what one does to be punk. Maybe buy an expensive jacket? Maybe don’t buy a jacket at all? Be yourself. If you want to see some cool bands and some cool art, come check out this event.

OKG: What’s something this state needs more of?

RA: Compassion. Maybe understanding? People letting other people be themselves without feeling the need to judge them or criticize them or pass legislation against them for just wanting to live and feel OK about who they are.

OKG: Do you have a bucket list? If so, what does it include?

RA: Who has time to make a list when they're busy living?

OKG: Do you consider yourself career-driven?

RA: I understand the need for gainful employment and a sustainable income in modern American society. I currently partake in both. But I don’t know about being career-driven. I would say that by this definition, I feel that I am driven. But I see far more importance in living and experiencing the world around me than I do clocking in. If anything, I am driven by creativity and curiosity, and that has provided me with many different opportunities as well as unique life experiences.

OKG: What’s the No. 1 question you’re glad I didn’t ask?

RA: Oklahoma really is a special place full of great people doing things that are so inspiring. There is a vast pool of creative individuals making beautiful visual art, making music that hits you so hard, making their own world a better place and, in turn, making life more enjoyable for all of us. I feel lucky to be surrounded by so many outstanding individuals. It feels really good to be a part of something bigger than one person, bigger than one band. I hope that everyone reading this gets to experience that in their lifetime. Whatever question that answers, I’m glad you didn’t ask that.


Everything Is Not OK II: How Do You Put A Price On Garbage?

7 p.m. March 10-13

89th Street Collective

8911 N. Western Ave.

noon March 11 and 13

Snug Lounge

2321 S. Robinson Ave.

3 p.m. March 11 and 13, 4 p.m. March 12

District House

1755 NW 16th St.

10 a.m. March 12

The Red Cup

3122 N. Classen Blvd.

noon March 12

Tree and Leaf Clothing

1705B NW 16th St.

Free-$20


Print headline: Trash days, Everything Is Not OK organizer Roz Adams hopes the city is ready for another round of the DIY punk event.

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